wet house

Originally Posted By: rpalac
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Okay Carla…were all coming over for a road trip to see this and put our two cents in …I guess it’s hard to put a finger on it with so many variables and not seeing it.


Gerry, I do need to be corrected on the vapor barrier method in one regard. Yes, That is the standard way that it normally has been done in the past. (referring to your diagram)
I believe that they are up in the air about that now.....It almost depends on the air tightness and type of ventilation going on in the house.

Basement insulating has no real proven method from what I have been reading. I spoke about it in class tonight and the engineers and architects were divided in to about forty different ways to insulate the walls.

Most guys did refer to the polly being on the crete wall and a strong craft paper vapor barrier being in place.....yet others agreed that this is no longer a good method..... who knows.

An interesting question did come up......

The Q that might be some play.
What is the water table like? Is there hydraulic pressure or improper grading? Is water possibly coming up the slab and wicking?

Geeee, I'm reaching here but there are so many possibilities.....
Here are my questions?

Is there a canoe tied to the bottom step of basement stairs? (dead give away)

Have you seen port holes in the walls and do the doors have funny looking spin type locks?

Is there a rope tied from the telephone pole to the house outside?

Okay...next

Bob


Originally Posted By: jpeck
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Here is Chad’s link.


I tampered with it because there were "-" where "/" should have been and a "/" at the end which should not have been there (just explaining the problem for future links).

http://www.buildingscience.com/resources/foundations/basement_insulation_systems.pdf


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Guest
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Thanks Jerry,


From now on I’ll send them directly to you and save myself the angst that is the result of me trying to do it.


Joe Lstiburek co-authored the article, if you want to know about building science pertaining to ventilation and insulation, this guy is the guru.


Originally Posted By: rpalac
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



great refference link…


thank you


Originally Posted By: jpeck
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Chad Fabry wrote:
Thanks Jerry,
From now on I'll send them directly to you ...


no, no, no, that's why I said "(just explaining the problem for future links). ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: chorne
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Thanks for all the responses!


Just an update, the vaulted roof windows were insulated, the poly
was removed from the foundation walls, and the ridge vent was
replaced.
everything is drying up.
It's amazing what can happen to a house in a short period of time
when it is not insulated and or vented properly.

Thanks again,

Carla


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Carla,


It sure does sound like this house is suffocating. The first thing that I would make certain of is that the attic space is breathing. Assuming you are speaking of soffit and ridge vents, make sure they are not blocked and allowing the attic space to breath. If there is not much air flow, possibly adding a few powered roof vents to the attic space to see if that alleviates the problem. The next, while a little more extreme, would be to remove the poly between the ceilings and the attic, while time consuming, should be relatively easy to do with a sharp blade in a utility knife.

I don't believe the moisture problem is the result of the slab, although since it is restricting the air flow through the walls, it is just exaggerating the problem.

Joe Myers