WH drain in washer stand pipe

Not the smartest install, as one can never see when the T&P valve begins to weep but is it ok to install this way?

Needs to discharge via a visible air gap. So you pretty much called it. Can’t see the discharge…

Thanks Mark!

In San Diego it is allowable to have a T&P line discharge into a laundry drain. I see it all the time. What you see there is ok

Chuck

What is “allowed” by an AHJ, should be irrelevant to a calling out a condition that is potentially fatal to a client.Maybe they do allow it to discharge into a drain as long as it didn’t violate any other safety concerns… Here are the vitals of what you need in regards to a TPR discharge…

  1.    The following recommendations regarding TPR discharge pipes are based largely on the 2006 International Residential Code P2803.61 as well as other building and plumbing codes.
    

The discharge piping serving a TPR valve should:

  1.    Be constructed of an approved material such as CPVC, copper, polyethylene, galvanized steel, polybutylene, polypropylene, or stainless steel. 
    
  2.    Not be smaller than the diameter of the outlet of the valve it serves (usually no smaller than 3/4"). 
    
  3.    Shall not reduce in size from the valve to the air gap (point of discharge). 
    
  4.    Be as short and as straight as possible so as to avoid undue stress on the valve. 
    
  5.    Be installed so as to drain by flow of gravity. 
    
  6.    Not be trapped since standing water may become contaminated and backflow into the potable water. 
    
  7.    Discharge to the floor, to an indirect waste receptor, or to the outdoors.  
    
  8.    Not be directly connected to the drainage system to prevent backflow of potentially contaminating the potable water. 
    
  9.    Discharge through a visible air gap (atmosphere) in the same room as the water heater. 
    
  10. Be first piped to an indirect waste receptor through an air gap located in a heated area when discharging to the outdoors in areas subject to freezing, since freezing water could block the pipe. 
    
  11. Not terminate more than 6 inches (152 mm) above the floor or waste receptor. 
    
  12. Discharge in a manner that could not cause scalding. 
    
  13. Discharge in a manner that could not cause structural or property damage. 
    
  14. **Discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by occupants because discharge indicates that something is wrong. **
  15. **Be piped independent of other equipment drains, water heater pans, or relief valve discharge piping to the point of discharge. **
  16. Not have valves anywhere. 
    
  17. Not have tee fittings. 
    
  18. Not have a threaded connection at the end of the pipe so as to avoid capping.

Thanks Chuck and Mark.

Reading post 5 - #9 would be an issue as well since the pipe extended into the standpipe a short distance.

Yep, that goes along with #14 IMO.

I hope that power strip was called out also.

Am I missing something obvious? What’s wrong with using a power strip?

Looks to me that it is being used as a permanent conductor.
(not allowed)

Not happy with a few other situations either.

Power strip.jpg

Ditto what Chuck said.

What is wrong with San Diego that they would allow it.?

I would not even mention it out of civic pride if I lived there.

What may or may not be “allowed” by someone has no bearing on what I write in my home inspection report.

I cannot report on what I cannot see…and if I am forced to assume, I will assume gray water backflow when I cannot see an air gap.

What is “allowed” by an AHJ, should be irrelevant to a calling out a condition that is potentially fatal to a client.Maybe they do allow it to discharge into a drain as long as it didn’t violate any other safety concerns… Here are the vitals of what you need in regards to a TPR discharge…

  1. The following recommendations regarding TPR discharge pipes are based largely on the 2006 International Residential Code P2803.61 as well as other building and plumbing codes.
    The discharge piping serving a TPR valve should:
  2. Be constructed of an approved material such as CPVC, copper, polyethylene, galvanized steel, polybutylene, polypropylene, or stainless steel.
  3. Not be smaller than the diameter of the outlet of the valve it serves (usually no smaller than 3/4").
  4. Shall not reduce in size from the valve to the air gap (point of discharge).
  5. Be as short and as straight as possible so as to avoid undue stress on the valve.
  6. Be installed so as to drain by flow of gravity.
  7. Not be trapped since standing water may become contaminated and backflow into the potable water.
  8. Discharge to the floor, to an indirect waste receptor, or to the outdoors.
  9. Not be directly connected to the drainage system to prevent backflow of potentially contaminating the potable water.
  10. Discharge through a visible air gap (atmosphere) in the same room as the water heater.
  11. Be first piped to an indirect waste receptor through an air gap located in a heated area when discharging to the outdoors in areas subject to freezing, since freezing water could block the pipe.
  12. Not terminate more than 6 inches (152 mm) above the floor or waste receptor.
  13. Discharge in a manner that could not cause scalding.
  14. Discharge in a manner that could not cause structural or property damage.
  15. **Discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by occupants because discharge indicates that something is wrong. **
  16. **Be piped independent of other equipment drains, water heater pans, or relief valve discharge piping to the point of discharge. **
  17. Not have valves anywhere.
  18. Not have tee fittings.
  19. Not have a threaded connection at the end of the pipe so as to avoid capping.

Sounds great but remember this is federal code and can be superceded by local codes and/ or ordinances. No plastic piping in Chicago for connections on Tpv. Hot water will melt those lines like you would not believe.

Then why is CPVC allowed as a T&P connection line? The max water temp would only be 210 F??

Chuck

“codes” and what is “allowed” are irrelevant in regards to if we call something out or not.

In regards to plastic: CPVC, polyethylene, polybutylene, polypropylene are all rated for this purpose because they don’t melt. PVC is only rated for 150 degrees, so that would be what you would want to look out for in that regard. (I’ve also seen a garden hose directly connected to the TPR.:roll:) If they aren’t “allowed” in your jurisdiction, then it would be appropriate to say so, but I would also mention that it is a local ordinance, and not necessarily required for repair during a real estate transaction (at least not where I am).