What the heck is a Neutral?

Originally Posted By: joetedesco
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Why is the term Neutral not defined yet? Can somebody help here? icon_lol.gif


Take a look over here:

http://electrical-contractor.net/ubb/Forum4/HTML/000443.html

The 2008 NEC may finally add a definition.

Go on give it your best shot!

PS:

Branch Circuit, Multiwire. A branch circuit that consists
of two or more ungrounded conductors that have a voltage
between them, and a grounded conductor that has equal
voltage between it and each ungrounded conductor of the
circuit and that is connected to the neutral or grounded
conductor of the system.


--
Joe Tedesco, Massachusetts
Home Inspector Provider
www.joetedesco.org
necmeister@gmail.com

www.nachi.org/tedesco.htm
www.nachi.org/tedesco2.htm
www.nachi.org/illinoislicense.htm
www.nachi.org/jtarticles.htm

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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A neutral is the grounded conductor designed to carry unbalanced current between phases, not to be confused with the grounded conductor in corner grounded delta. (both are white)


Originally Posted By: pabernathy
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Joe,


I have posted the official definition of the term as I do not write for the NEC Review Board and like you simply make suggestions to it's revisions.

The post you linked to in not a good example of needing to know the term of Neutral but more over the violation of conductions of the same circuit remain in the same raceway....but never the less a interesting picture and love the ground wires jumping outside the panel.

I will assume the conduits were sized right.....some look very crowded but again I usually do not comment alot on those things unless I can really see it well.

Now chances of the EC re-running N and G's in those already pulled conduit bring up others issues as well.....As a EI myself my solution which the EC would not like...is the re-pulling of the conductors by someone who knows what they are doing in respect to this.


Neutral here has two subtly different meanings:

In a polyphase or three-wire AC system, the neutral conductor is intended to have similar voltages to each of the other circuit conductors, and similar phase spacing. As stated in [1] by this definition a circuit must have at least three wires for one to serve as a neutral.

However, in the electrical trade, in a 2-wire circuit, the conductor that is connected back to the supply neutral point is also referred to as the "neutral"; this is formally described in the US and Canadian electrical codes as the "identified" circuit conductor. If the entire system is only single phase then the current carrying conductor that is tied to earth is still a neutral by this definition.

all in all........Greys definition will do for me...I try not to define it I try to explain what it does and why it is needed...lol


--
Paul W. Abernathy- NACHI Certified
Electrical Service Specialists
Licensed Master Electrician
Electrical Contractor
President of NACHI Central Virginia Chapter
NEC Instructor
Moderator @ Doityourself.com
Visit our website- www.electrical-ess.com

Originally Posted By: joetedesco
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Thanks Greg and Paul:


If a definition for that term can be developed, it can be submitted to the NEC CMP for a new definition in Article 100.

I did that a few cycles ago, and it was rejected and accepted and finally in the comment stage rejected, now I am aware that there will be a proposal to add that term developed by a committee.

I welcome your comments and will look forward to some hearty discussion related to the electrical industry, both for HI and EI and EC, etc.

PS: I have the reports of the committees since the 1953 NEC, working for NFPA was a great experience.

PSS: I hope they are not talking about you Paul ![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)

http://www.electrical-contractor.net/ubb/Forum1/HTML/001710.html


--
Joe Tedesco, Massachusetts
Home Inspector Provider
www.joetedesco.org
necmeister@gmail.com

www.nachi.org/tedesco.htm
www.nachi.org/tedesco2.htm
www.nachi.org/illinoislicense.htm
www.nachi.org/jtarticles.htm

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Quote:
In a polyphase or three-wire AC system, the neutral conductor is intended to have similar voltages to each of the other circuit conductors, and similar phase spacing.


How about center tapped (red leg) delta?
One of the phases is 208 above ground and the other two are 120.
When you put these up on a scope, referenced to ground, you will see some strange phase relationships


Originally Posted By: pabernathy
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lol…No Joe…I do not visit into the wonderful world of West Virginia. I happen to have a RECIP with WV but really only work in VA and NC…NC VERY LITTLE…


lol......Everyone likes me Joe.....![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Paul W. Abernathy- NACHI Certified
Electrical Service Specialists
Licensed Master Electrician
Electrical Contractor
President of NACHI Central Virginia Chapter
NEC Instructor
Moderator @ Doityourself.com
Visit our website- www.electrical-ess.com