What would you do??

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/IMG_00061.JPG ]



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.

Originally Posted By: charper
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Scott,


Looks like to me that this crack is more than hairline. If you guys have a earthquake that post is going to fall off. Perhaps the concrete is not given a chance to cure properly since the other homes are like this too. When the house settles in 1 - 2 years that crack is going to get bigger. I would definitely write it up to be watched very closely.

Charlie.


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Is this for a “builders warranty inspection” or transfer of ownership.


I would recommend repairs by the builder in any case (considering that this is only an 8 month old home). As previously mentioned, we're in a shaky state. There is no doubt that this crack will increase in size and severity over time.

You may be able to use this to your advantage and sell a few more inspections on the same block ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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The buyer called for the inspection. I agree that the builder should REPAIR this not just slather a little patch job to cover over this.



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.

Originally Posted By: dvalley
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David Valley


MAB Member


Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: Guest
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The photo’s so big it’s hard to get a sense of scale, but the slab doesn’t look cracked, it looks broken.


Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi to all,


I would certainly call that out, it sure as heck isn't going to get any better, and I have a feelingthat it may well de pretty deficient in the rebar dept.

Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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This is not a warrenty inspection just a standard transsfer of ownership inspection. The house is not completed yey (floor coverings still going in) along with “punchlist” stuff that will need to be done. I did not do a punchlist inspection (but I will offer). I think I will write it up as an item that should be repaired by the builder.



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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Chad, those are 8x8 posts SOLID wood.



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.

Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/IMG_00061resize.jpg ]


It looks like the crack originates at the base of the post, I would be looking for a PE. I am sure that the Concrete or its rebar is deficient

Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: Guest
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Part of the problem lies in that pretty exposed aggregate finish. To get that finish you’re supposed sprinkle aggregate on the freshly placed and screeded concrete, then float in the aggregate on the initial float until it just disappears beneath the fat. Just before the concrete’s gone (set) a light mist of water to rinse the fat off and leave the aggregate embedded.


That slab looks like they just added a lot of extra aggregates, cast the slab in place waited till it was nearly gone and then washed the fat. It probably will test pretty well for hardness, but it looks like a very weak piece of concrete to me...like old mortar


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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That crack looks like differential movement - settlement. I’d have a soils engineer look at it first to determine if the soil has sufficient load bearing capacity. Then a structural engineer to say the structure is okay once the soil problem is corrected.


Probably nothing more than poor soil compaction before pouring the foundation, but let those guys make that call.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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It’s a front porch…last thing I’d do is call a SE or GE out for that. Call the builder in and tell them to repair it if I were the homeowner.



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


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Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Kevin,


No, not the client call the GE or SE, but the client has the builder call them, I recommend that all the time when they have done screwy things to the trusses - I state what I find, with photos, and let the builder structural engineer / truss engineer design appropriate repairs. After all, the builder is responsible for the structural integrity of the structure, and that is obviously a problem.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/front%20resized.jpg ]



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.

Originally Posted By: dvalley
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Scott,


By the looks of that photo, it looks as if someone's evaluating or trying to cosmetically cover up that crack already.![](upload://gsLxWjRnp5GyE8SKolI6xnofWtZ.gif)


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: roconnor
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I agree with Jerry that it should be looked at by a professional, and not just patched (which is what ya know the builder will do) … except that IMHO there is no need to get a GE and then an SE. For residential structures all ya need is a good SE. Large commercial structures with poor/difficult soil conditions is something different.


Also, be very very careful with any repair recommendations on structural elements (not just this one). It puts a very large monkey squarely on your back as an HI.

Just my 2-nickels as an SE also ... ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
Eagle Eye Inspections ?
NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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From what was explained, I thought it was a simple porch…which is no big deal…but looking at the overall photo, it is apparent that it is very much a part of the home structure, and indeed needs a Professional evaluation. A SE was probably never even used on the whole project, and possibly the architect is the one that should get involved, and if he needs to consult with a SE, let him do it.



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


Search the directory for a Wisconsin Home Inspector

Originally Posted By: James D Mosier
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I had the same cracks in my front porch. New house also. Our problem stemmed from the fact that the pressure treated postes were embeded 2+" into the concrete. As the treated wood dries and warps, it cracked out the edges of my pad. Living where it freezes didn’t help matters either.


My builder refused to correct this, and many other items and after 4 years of court, with a lawyer of the same caliber as my builder, I had to tear out the whole pad and posts and replace the whole nine yards.

Buying this house is what originally led me to aspire to become a home inspector.


--
Jim Mosier

Originally Posted By: ssmith3
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These posts are also buried in the concrete.



Scott Smith


Marinspection


Vice President NorCal NACHI Chapter


I graduated from collage. Now my life is all mixed up.