WTF Picture of the Day

Well, it hasn’t fallen down…yet

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I think it just gave up…

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A defect I see quite often, the ceiling fan was not rated for damp areas.

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A ‘W’ trap in the wild. I guess they do exist.

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It could be so much easier to do it right…but, nooo.

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Bad idea.
Kitchen down draft vent connected to the dryer vent.
Look in the kitchen for that missing sock.

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People think inspectors just love to find issues. It’s like, really? You really think I want to work this hard? How about you fix a thing or two?

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It’s a brand new house, we don’t need an inspection.

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Right?! They just don’t get it. My preference would be to publish a zero defect report and play a round of 18, I mean 19. When will that day come? :sweat_smile:

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You itemized each one of these defects in the report? That sounds exhausting. Not only for you but also the reader.
image

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It is done automatically. Or is it automagically?

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What does 20 individual plumbing deficiencies look like in a report?

  1. Loose handle. Narrative. Photo
  2. Loose toilet. Narrative. Photo
  3. Faulty pop-up drain. Narrative. Photo.
  4. Hose bib fasteners. Narrative. Photo
  5. Etc
  6. Etc

Etc.

It’s plumbing and ventilation. It’s one of the biggest sections in my report and typically has the most callouts. I have dabbled with the idea of separating out actual plumbing from the other stuff, but there are a lot of “crossover” type things so for now I still have them together.

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Here is an option.
I place drain, waste, and vent system together (DWV)
I place water supply, distribution, and fixtures together.
Venting systems (bathroom, kitchen, laundry, and whole house fans)
Chimney, flues, and vents (for furnaces, boilers, water heaters, make-up air, etc)

Just like you, sump pumps and sewer ejection pumps are line items. (they are obviously different). And fuel storage and distribution are also separate.

In the top 5 of the worst roof Installations I’ve encountered.


This is new construction… My best guess is someone on the ground cut roof vent openings into the wrong edge of the sheathing and the sheathing installers installed it anyway. then the roofers installed the underlayment over the open holes in the sheathing. Then when the tile was loaded to the roof one of the loaders stepped into the hole and broke the underlayment. It’s an active roof leak.

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This home had some bat-proofing done. And I think someone thought they might be getting in under the drip edge and tried to fill those spaces with sealant, lol.

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The oozing home. That’s a hard sell.

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Seems like 1"x2" would have worked…and looked better… :thinking: :man_shrugging:

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WTF Wrong fasteners and OSB used as roof sheathing for a SWFL tile roof.

I think they succeeded wildly!

1 Like