CH double pole breaker?

Top left double pole breaker, however the handles aren’t connected together - what gives? Is it just in need of a handle tie? Some kind of specialty breaker I’m not familiar with? For an oven/stove, btw. TIA.

It is a “COMMON TRIP” breaker. That is to say: The common trip is to ensure that when one side of the breaker trips, the other side trips internally at the same time. At least, that is how I understand it…then, there is an “INDEPENDENT TRIP” or NON-COMMON" trip that would need to be tied together. I don’t know why the one below is tied together and the top on is not, however.


From above link:
Multi-pole circuit breakers are constructed with either a common trip, where all poles are mechanically tripped when one of the poles trips, or an independent trip construction where only the pole that is involved with the overcurrent condition trips. If a 2-pole circuit breaker does not have an internal common trip feature, then it must be marked “Independent Trip” or “No Common Trip.” NEC 240.20(B) is the foundational requirement for a common trip function in a circuit breaker; however, it also goes on to explain where independent trip is permitted.

I would say the handle tie is missing.

It’s a common trip where someone removed the plastic handle tie. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the handle tie on two SP breakers in the panel. :wink:

Are “common trip” breakers required to have the handle tie?

Thanks Robert… :slight_smile:

240.15(B) Circuit Breaker as Overcurrent Device. Circuit breakers
shall open all ungrounded conductors of the circuit both
manually and automatically unless otherwise permitted in
240.15(B)(1), (B)(2), (B)(3), and (B)(4).

Handle ties have an appropriate place in providing a means for protecting multiwire branch circuits.
However, they aren’t a replacement for common trip and shouldn’t be perceived that way.

Here is some GREAT advice from Ed Larsen with Square D (Retired Now) -

“Independent trip – Multi-pole circuit breakers are constructed with either a common trip, where all poles are mechanically tripped when one of the poles trips, or an independent trip construction where only the pole that is involved with the overcurrent condition trips. If a 2-pole circuit breaker does not have an internal common trip feature, then it must be marked “Independent Trip” or “No Common Trip.” NEC 240.20(B) is the foundational requirement for a common trip function in a circuit breaker; however, it also goes on to explain where independent trip is permitted.”