CSST narrative updates for the InterNACHI Narrative Library

These are new narratives for CSST. Bear in mind that they are far from complete considering the number of problems that can be associated with CSST.

Description
CSST is a thin-walled, flexible, corrugated stainless steel tubing covered by a coating that is typically yellow, sometimes black. Safety concerns exist concerning the ability of CSST to resist potential damage CSST is a thin-walled, flexible, corrugated stainless steel tubing covered by a coating that is typically yellow, sometimes black. Safety concerns exist concerning the ability of CSST to resist potential damage from lightning strikes- or near strikes- resulting in gas leakage and risk of explosion.

CSST has been the subject of a lawsuit that has now been settled. Pipes named in the suit are marked with one of the following: GASTITE, WARDFLEX, TRACPIPE, COUNTERSTRIKE or PARFLEX. Gas pipes in this home consisted of CSST that contained one or more of these markings. Installations of concern are those pipes installed after September 5, 2006.

· Those inspecting CSST must have a copy of ANSI LC-1/CSA6.26 AND a copy of the manufacturer’s installation instructions. This means that most inspectors should disclaim CSST.

· CSST is semi-rigid, not flexible, and is designed to be bent to shape during installation and then to remain stationary (furnaces, boilers, water heaters, etc.). It should not be exposed to impact, vibration, or repeated movement;

o CSST should not connect directly to ranges and clothes dryers, but should terminate at a CSST termination fitting;

o CSST should not connect directly to ranges and clothes dryers, but should be connected using a flexible gas appliance connector.

· CSST must be installed using proprietary fittings, with manufacturer’s installation instructions taking precedence over building code;

· CSST must have proprietary puncture protection places installed where there exists the possibility for puncture by fasteners. Standard nail plates are inadequate.

· CSST must be properly bonded and grounded for protection from lightning strikes;

· CSST must be listed for direct burial;

· CSST must NOT be attached to a log lighter for a solid fuel-burning fireplace;

DISCLAIMER
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe. CSST is a thin-walled, semi-rigid, corrugated stainless steel tubing covered by a jacket that is typically yellow, sometimes black. Safety concerns exist concerning the ability of CSST to resist potential damage from lightning strikes- or near strikes- resulting in gas leakage and risk of explosion.
CSST has been the subject of a lawsuit that has now been settled. Pipes named in the suit are marked with one of the following: GASTITE,WARDFLEX, TRACPIPE, COUNTERSTRIKE or PARFLEX. Gas pipes in this home consisted of CSST which contained one or more of these markings. Installations of concern are those pipes installed after September 5, 2006.
Installed correctly, CSST must be properly bonded and grounded. Inspection of CSST requires the inspector to have a copy of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) LC-1/CSA6.26 plus a copy of the manufacturer’s installation instructions. For this reason, inspection of CSST lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that inspection of the CSST gas piping be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

CSST not bonded
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas pipe that was not electrically bonded. CSST has specific bonding requirements that must be complied with for safety reasons. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

CSST not properly bonded
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed that was not properly bonded. CSST has specific bonding requirements that must be complied with for safety reasons. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

CSST buried but not listed- QC
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe. Although the Inspector disclaims full inspection of the CSST, the Inspector observed portions of CSST pipe directly buried underground. CSST must be listed for direct burial. The Inspector was unable to see any markings on the CSST indicating that it was listed for this application. This condition is potentially hazardous and the Inspector recommends full inspection by a qualified plumbing contractor.

CSST attached to movable appliance- QC
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe. CSST is designed to be attached to stationary appliances only. CSST in this home was attached to an appliance that was movable. This condition is potentially hazardous. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified plumbing contractor.

CSST attached to log lighter
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas pipe that was attached to a log lighter installed in a solid fuel-burning fireplace. This condition is potentially hazardous and should be corrected by a The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas pipe that was not electrically bonded. CSST has specific bonding requirements that must be complied with for safety reasons. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

CSST improper fittings
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe that was connected to improper fittings. This condition is potentially hazardous and should be corrected by a qualified plumbing contractor.

CSST inadequate puncture protection plates
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe that was not adequately protected from puncture by fasteners. CSST requires proprietary puncture protection plates when installed in a a location in which puncture by fasteners is possible. Locations at which protection plates were visible exhibited plates that were of an improper, inadequate type. Not all such locations were visible. This condition is potentially hazardous. Confirmation of proper plate installation at hidden locations would require invasive measures such as drywall removal at these areas. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline, yuou consult with a qualified plumbing contractor to discuss options and costs for correction.

CSST missing puncture protection plates
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe that was not adequately protected from puncture by fasteners. CSST requires proprietary puncture protection plates when installed in a location in which puncture by fasteners is possible. Locations at which this condition was visible had no such puncture protection plates installed. Not all such locations with the potential for this condition to exist were visible. This condition is potentially hazardous. Confirmation of proper plate installation at hidden locations would require invasive measures such as drywall removal at these areas. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline, you consult with a qualified plumbing contractor to discuss options and costs for correction.

3 Likes

Thank you Kenton!

Nice narratives, thank you for your sharing.

I never trusted it!
That last time, I insisted they break out pipe and threader!

Also if you read; https://blog.nationwide.com/csst-safety/

They also recommend ; it’s smart to have your piping system inspected by a licensed electrician.

CSST pipes may not have been installed to current model code requirements

Some 500,000 new homes in the United States have CSST installed each year. But since regulations directing how pipes are bonded and grounded were not adopted until 2006, it’s smart to have your piping system inspected by a licensed electrician.

Properly bonding and grounding a CSST gas line system is critical

Direct bonding better secures electrical continuity and conductivity through metal pipes, while grounding can send any lightning strike into the ground. CSST systems installed before the bonding/grounding rules are susceptible to lightning strikes, which can cause electrical shocks.

Direct bonding on your natural gas system reduces the chances of electrical shock, as well as a natural gas leak or fire.

CSST pipes can be damaged by lightning

Lightning striking a CSST gas line system can be extremely dangerous. A strike on or near a building can travel through the structure’s piping system and cause a damaging power surge that can produce a gas leak or fire.

1 Like

I have very seldom seen CSST used in my area (maybe 6-7 homes in the past 10 years)…however Yesterday’s inspection, there it was in all it’s unbonded glory (built 2001). Thanks for this timely post.

1 Like

Updates:

Attached to movable appliance- QC
The home had semi-rigid, corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe. CSST is designed to be attached to stationary appliances only (such as a furnace, water heater, or cooktop). CSST in this home was attached to an appliance that was movable (such as a dryer or range). CSST should be attached so such appliances through an appliance connector listed for this use. This condition is potentially hazardous. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified plumbing contractor.

DISCLAIMER
The home had corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) installed as gas distribution pipe. CSST is a thin-walled, semi-rigid, corrugated stainless steel tubing covered by a jacket that is typically yellow, sometimes black. Safety concerns exist concerning the ability of CSST to resist potential damage from lightning strikes- or near strikes- resulting in gas leakage and risk of explosion.
CSST has been the subject of a lawsuit that has now been settled. Pipes named in the suit are marked with one of the following: GASTITE,WARDFLEX, TRACPIPE, COUNTERSTRIKE or PARFLEX. Gas pipes in this home consisted of CSST which contained one or more of these markings. Installations of concern are those pipes installed after September 5, 2006.
Installed correctly, CSST must be properly bonded and grounded. Inspection of CSST typically requires the inspector to have a copy of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) LC-1/CSA6.26 plus a copy of the manufacturer’s installation instructions. In addition, CSST has a number of other special installation requirements that can vary by individual installation, installation age, manufacturer, and jurisdiction. For this reason, inspection of CSST lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that inspection of the CSST gas piping be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

1 Like

Kenton, you need to add language calling out CSST that directly enters a furnace cabinet with a chimney.

ANSI LC 1 ● CSA 6.26, Section 4.7, q) CSST shall not be directly routed into a metallic gas appliance enclosure utilizing a metallic vent that penetrates a roofline. The CSST connection shall be made outside of the metallic gas appliance enclosure to a section of rigid metallic pipe, stub‐out, or termination fittings.

Furnace cabinet with a chimney, Bob? You mean a furnace with a vent connector that penetrates a chimney? I don’t have access to ANSI standards. Do you have an ICC reference?

I posted exactly what it says. Item q} above. I know we had a thread about this a while back. It specifies a metallic gas appliance using a metallic vent that penetrates he roof line. Around here those are furnaces but they could be vented gas fireplaces.

I don’t have the document in question. I just read the changes made in it that are available with a simple Google search. The item I quoted was an addition to the 2014 for the 2016 publication.