Electric Meter Exposure

Originally Posted By: ccowles
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/I/elec mtr.JPG ]


Originally Posted By: dvalley
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Welcome to NACHI, Calvin


Looks good to me. I see this type of installation of the SE meter every day.


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: bking
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I would mention this possible problem in the report but not consider it a defect or immediate safety issue. Safety issue depends on the whole area, are cars backing or turning near this? Always report what you observe especially if you are not sure.



www.BAKingHomeInspections.com

Originally Posted By: ccowles
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I planned to report it but wanted a suggestion as to how severe to make the issue. The meter comes 6" or so away from the house and i could easily see a pick-up door being opened right into it. Thanks for you help.


Originally Posted By: jlybolt
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meter height is the utility company call-


as per code check that usually is 44 to 66 inches.


check with local municipality if concerned its too close to ground but it looks good to me


Originally Posted By: mcyr
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icon_smile.gif


Ditto:


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Quote:
240.24 (C) - Not Exposed to Physical Damage. Overcurrent devices shall be located where they will not be exposed to physical damage.



--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: lgoodman
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ground wire belongs in conduit.


Originally Posted By: ekartal
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Jeff,


Were you an electrician is another life? aiwebs_002.gif


Erol Kartal


Originally Posted By: jpope
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ekartal wrote:
Jeff,
Were you an electrician is another life? ![aiwebs_002.gif](upload://mGwppwEnrWqEGXBYiZkao7V64mT.gif)

Erol Kartal


Nope.

To be quite honest, I hate electricity.


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: jlybolt
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Quote:
ground wire belongs in conduit


Is this local code?? ![icon_question.gif](upload://t2zemjDOQRADd4xSC3xOot86t0m.gif)



Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Securing and Protection Against Physical Damage.


Where exposed, a grounding electrode conductor or its enclosure must be securely fastened to the surface on which it is carried.

A 4 AWG or larger copper or aluminum grounding electrode conductor must be protected where exposed to physical damage.

A 6 AWG grounding electrode conductor that is free from exposure to physical damage is permitted to be run along the surface of the building construction without metal covering or protection where it is securely fastened to the construction; otherwise, it must be in rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, rigid nonmetallic conduit, electrical metallic tubing, or cable armor.

Grounding electrode conductors smaller than 6 AWG must be in rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, rigid nonmetallic conduit, electrical metallic tubing, or cable armor.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: James D Mosier
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What about the 4 yr old boy driving his tonka truck on that wall? If by chance there were current to ground in that wire he could easily become the path of least resistance.


That ground wire installation needs looked at.


--
Jim Mosier

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Jim:


Possibly, can you explain this in more detail for the Home Inspector?

I thought you were a member of NACHI?


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: James D Mosier
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Joe,


Not a member yet, not even a HI yet, but working on it.

The ground wire is used to return current to ground in the case of an electrical equipment malfuction causing the body/frame/whatever of said device to become energized. This ground wire could also be energized by incorrect ground-neutral bonding at a sub panel without the need for equipment malfunction. I'm also going to guess that a third possiblity could be an "open" in the neutral service wire that would cause this ground to act as the main neutral for the entire service.

Add to any of the above scenarios a child (or adult) with or without a metal object in hand coming into contact with this "hot" ground. Now all we need is for that unfortunate person to be grounded. Maybe they're barefoot, maybe it's raining, or the driveway is wet from washing the car. Now we have our completed circuit.

How'd I do Joe? Please critique my answer with brutal honesty, I can take it. Maybe I'm not exactly right about the electrical specifics, maybe I'm taking my scenarios too far out into left field, but I'm here to learn and wouldn't want to be wrong twice.


--
Jim Mosier

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Close enough, I would be more concerned if the grounding electrode conductor was loose, or not connected when the kid was in series with it especially during a lighting strike. The fault that we are thinking of would find its way through the main bonding jumper onto the neutral and will help to facilitate the operation of the main overcurrent device.



Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant


www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: ccowles
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icon_eek.gif Thanks to all who took the time to respond. It all helped make my report more complete. Another good reason for joining up with you NACHI guys.


Thanks again,
Cal Cowles


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Jim the brutal honesty is that the “ground” (grounding electrode conductor) IS NOT the path for fault current. Fault current goes down the neutral to the X0 terminal of the transformer. If the neutral was loose, as Joe mentioned, not only would the GEC be energized, so would the plumbing, the meter base and any other “grounded” metal.


Originally Posted By: James D Mosier
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Thanks Greg, like I said I’m here to learn.


Now you got me wondering though, because the fault current goes down the neutral to the X0 terminal of the transformer do we really need the
GEC? Is that neutral always the path of least resistance?

I have read on here somewhere of someone that checks for and has actually found current in the GEC.

Of course as Joe mentioned, in a fault situation the main overcurrent device should take care of the matter.


--
Jim Mosier

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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The grounding electrode system is to stabilize the entire system to a common potential. It tends to guarantee that the “grounded” case of equipment is very close to the potential of the concrete floors of the house. That will vary with the quality of the grounding electrode, hence the GFCI requirements in garages, unfinished basements and outside.


The primary intent is to minimize common mode transients like lightning or other surges. In that respect it is also important that all utilities use the same grounding system.