floor outlet receptacle

The only comment I will make about water being a conductor is this…it is a weak one but it is one in a sense that if we are talking about saturation of the outlet with water and it is “STANDING”…and you reach and come in contact with the water it could very well be your last contact…if the conditions are right…

So it is not as much in just having a liquid associated with it…it is what happens as we come in contact with the liquid in this example.

I believe that IF you saw sparks…there is another issue going on in that outlet that preceeded this event…and the moisture simply assperated the condition.

Pure water is a poor conductor but that is hard to find. It only takes a small bit of minerals to make it a surprisingly good conductor. I did some experiments many years ago with a white bucket and 2 10ga probes exactly 1 foot apart, 6" in the water.
<from memory I think the following was true>
Using distilled water the conductivity was very low but a pinch of salt made a 60w bulb start to glow. With a shotglass of salt the 60w bulb burned a warm yellow.
My well water was similar to the test “ionized” water. When I used (Gulf) sea water (~37PPT) the bulb was almost full brightness.

If you want to try this be sure your test setup is such that you are nowhere near the bucket when you energize it since the seawater was boiling pretty good with power applied.

I may try this again with better testing standards if anyone is interested.

Couple that with most solvents having so many chemicals and so on within it…could happen I guess…:slight_smile:

Hey Speed,

Are you illiterate or just simply not reading my posts correctly?

Would you be so kind to highlight where I had stated that I’d write up a floor receptacle that had a legal floor cover.

You need to wake up a smell the Daises my friend.

See the information that I listed in my post above {#17};

2006 international residential code for one and two family dwellings
**E3801.2.1 Spacing. **
Receptacles shall be installed so that no point measured horizontally along the floor line in any wall space is more than 6 feet (1829 mm), from a receptacle outlet.
E3801.2.2 Wall space.
As used in this section, a wall space shall include the following:

  1. Any space that is 2 feet (610 mm) or more in width, (including space measured around corners), and that is unbroken along the floor line by doorways, fireplaces, and similar openings.
  2. The space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, excluding sliding panels.
  3. The space created by fixed room dividers such as railings and freestanding bar-type counters
    **E3801.2.3 Floor receptacles. **
    Receptacle outlets in floors shall not be counted as part of the required number of receptacle outlets except where located within 18 inches (457 mm) of the wall.

I’m not sure why everyone’s jumping Speedy’s case. You all are saying the same things in different ways. Speedy’s just making sure everyone’s on the same page.

No one is jumping on his case. However if you’re going to attempt quote code or speak in an authoritative manner and contradict someone you should be correct in what you say.

2006 international residential code for one and two family dwellings
**E3801.2.1 Spacing. **
Receptacles shall be installed so that no point measured horizontally along the floor line in any wall space is more than 6 feet (1829 mm), from a receptacle outlet.
E3801.2.2 Wall space.
As used in this section, a wall space shall include the following:

  1. Any space that is 2 feet (610 mm) or more in width, (including space measured around corners), and that is unbroken along the floor line by doorways, fireplaces, and similar openings.
  2. The space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, excluding sliding panels.
  3. The space created by fixed room dividers such as railings and freestanding bar-type counters
    **E3801.2.3 Floor receptacles. **
    Receptacle outlets in floors shall not be counted as part of the required number of receptacle outlets except where located within 18 inches (457 mm) of the wall.

From the information that we have gathered here this floor receptacle is nothing more than a “convenience receptacle”. The picture clearly shows that it is covered and thus supposedly protected.
I am sure that there will be many that come up with their “what if” scenarios but then again all of this debate is meaningless and serves no useful purpose.

No, ‘what if’s’, brother. It’s clear to me that you’re both saying the same thing in different ways. No matter…

David, first off, chill the hell out!

Explain the above quote then. I must be confused by your ambiguosity.
It sounds like you would write up any floor receptacle.

Frank, I am surprised with all your years of experience you still do not understand this.

“***No point along a wall is more than 6’ from a receptacle.***”
This DOES NOT mean the receptacles must be 6’ apart. It means they can be 12’ apart.
Point to a spot on the wall. There must be a receptacle within 6’ of your finger, in either direction.

You’re the one with the attitude there, Buddy. I’m a happy individual.

There’s no ambiguosity whatsoever, you simply have to open your eyes and use your brain and look a little further on down into the thread, I clearly stated this…

I did state

because I’ve never ran into a protected receptacle…Period.

Whatever Dave. Obviously you need to open your eyes and use your brain as well I guess.
You are confusing disagreement with attitude. There IS a difference.

Which is odd. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a floor receptacle without a floor cover.
Must be a location thing.

It seems a lot of people misinterpret that.

I find that as well. I really do wish they would re-word that paragraph of the code, or at least clarify a bit.

Some of us must really like to write things up. 98% of the time when I see these they’re in the middle of a good sized room AND the furniture placement is such that there will be a light or couch, end table, etc over them.

They’re a convenience so the occupants can place their furniture, lights in a reasonable arrangement AND not be stringing extension cords all across the floor where they REALLY become a trip hazard.

Here you go from an inspection last week.:slight_smile:PICT9954.JPG

Write it up!

Of course it happens. Like I said, I just can’t remember the last time I saw that.

Thank you William. This is the only type I find on a regular basis. That’s why I write them up.

Well Duh!

Speedy is an electrician who knows how to install them correctly. That’s what he sees.

Most of the rest of us here are HIs who see the the results of Home Owner Harry NOT hiring a qualified electrician or bothering to find out the what correct way to install them is. That’s what we see.

So let’s all just realize we come at this issue from different perspectives.

No need for all the acrimony generated here.:slight_smile:

The only problem that I see with that statement is that sometimes a floor receptacle is the only means to satisfy the 6’ rule for receptacle spacing, say for instance on a balcony with 15’ of railing. The railing counts as wall space and must be provided with properly spaced receptacles to meet code requirements.