G.F.I. tripped and still has power

You can believe what you see.
No way will I except what is shown with out proper evidence .
This information would never stand up in Court .
I see you are a student I would say why not talk to your instructor about this .

The GFCI in the first thread is only 5 years old, it has that feature.

And who do you expect to provide that evidence? BTW, that title is incorrect, but technically outside of electrical I am an HI student so I stay quiet. :mrgreen:

Why not try the manufacture I have more confidence in them over some thing posted on youtube

You are basically throwing legit experiences under the bus. Is it not possible for the contacts inside the GFCI to weld shut? You ask me to present evidence, yet you speak with such authority on the subject. If you have evidence to show me that it is impossible for the contacts inside a GFCI to weld shut I will believe you.

Well 18 years as a home inspector and over 50 years as an electrician I do not think I have to believe what you have posted from youtube .

While I can’t speak for you, I posted this on Mike Holts and they are saying pretty much what I am saying:

http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=178511

But speaking for myself you are willing to tell me that it is physically impossible for a GFCI’s internal contacts to weld shut?

No I will not .
I wish you well and do hope you make a good living doing home Inspecting .
Looks to me like you have confidence to get started soon.

Consider this, the unit is 5 years old and Smart lock pro which means it will not reset if wired incorrectly. Yet it still trips and resets. Why would that be?

Have you had any of things happen that you are asking questions about .
I have not and do not remember any Home Inspector asking the questions like you are .
I wish you well Done spending any more time on this subject.
A good string to look at might just help increase your knowledge .

So you do agree thats its possible for such a failure mode to take place?

Ok, Im lost and not sure what you are trying to say. How is my case different then the OP’s? GFCI trips and still has power, same thing. And just because you have not encountered a stuck GFCI does not mean such a beast is not impossible. Several people report it in this thread and I saw it in first hand. Not sure why you are trying to discredit me.

You take a 3 year old post that has been talked about many years ago and expect it should be brought back to go over again .
You are doing a good job all by your self
( ** Not sure why you are trying to discredit me** ). I am done I give up .

Because I ran into the same issue and thought Id add to this thread both for my sake and the future in case an inspector comes across the same thing. You are making it sound like this is a none issue and my video (along with the OP) is somehow not to be believed.

Tripped but still live GFCI receptacles are not rare, but not exactly common. I would say 2-3% will trip but still have power. And out of those, the ones with the red / black buttons are the vast majority. Probably due to age.

I know this is an old thread, but always, useful and worth repeating.

Lets see if Eric responds.

You still using that nightlight or three bulb testers? I certainly hope not.

As a former Licensed Electrical Contractor #26286 and a current Electrical Safety Inspector #2116 I can tell you devices fail!

Last month I pushed the test button on a GFCI about the same age in the OP.

It sparked and tripped the breaker. When asked the adult son home from college said “oh my brother re-wired” that.

If something is defective I report it. I’m not being paid to find out why!

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I know this is an old thread, but always, useful and worth repeating.

Lets see if Eric responds.

You still using that nightlight or three bulb testers? I certainly hope not.

I am not sure what you want me to reply to, Robert.
The purpose of my original post, was stated in the first post.
Just making people aware that just because the test button popped out, doesn’t mean that power isn’t present, as demonstrated by the glowing lights on the tester.

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Morning Eric.
Hope to find you well and in good spirits today.

Truth be told. I thought this old thread was great to rehash for (2) reasons.

1: Roy Cooke was in this great thread.
I miss my buddy big time:slightly_frowning_face: His interaction on and off the message board should be highly regarded as to how one conducts themselves on and off the MB. Truly.
2: To make inspectors aware of the parels of utilizing these testers.
I am sure we all, or dam near most homies, started utilizing Three Bulb Testers when we entered the home inspection industry. Unfortunately, these testers did little more than giving you a false sense of security I came to learn many years ago. Now I consider them, a night light waiting penetrate your liability vail.

Thanks for the reply.
Keep well.
Robert Young