2 hot wires in a 2 prong receptical

Have a friend who has 2 pronged recepticals in the home. When tested he had no grounds which I expected. Anyway he wants to convert to grounded recepticals. Took off 2 cover plates and loosened the outlet and noticed that he had metallic sheathing with cloth covered copper wires. Upon further investigation both of the wires were hot. Found this out by disconnecting both wires from the outlet and tested both of them. This was not done from an inspection just for a friend. Can this type of wiring be used on a grounded receptical? If so how can this be done withoit rewiring the home. He is a disabled vet with little money so he can’t afford an electrician.

What did you test them with to verify they were both “hot”

I used my voltage detector

I think your friend needs to get an electrician into upgrade his wiring NOW!

That will give many false readings.

Get a test light that puts an actual load on the circuit or get a wiggy like us old farts use.

I think you’re missing some basic electrical testing techniques.

Dom.

Roy is full of crap as usual.

N.H. is a licensed state for doing electrical work .

https://www.ecsti.com/new-hampshire-state-requirements/

New Hampshire ElectricalLicense Requirements

Total Continuing Education Hours: 15 for Master & JourneymanElectricians

Continuing Education Requirements: 15 hours NEC/NFPA 70

Continuingeducation must be completed within 12 months from January 1st of the yearfollowing the issuance of the new edition of the National Electrical Code.

Renewal Cycle: Triennial
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Your detector is not picking up “hot”, it’s just saying they aren’t grounded.

There is likely a subpanel with bonded neutrals and grounds that setting your detector off.

You should be using a voltmeter if you really wanna test the wires.

A voltmeter will give Just as many false readings.

A voltmeter is the correct tool for the job, and any one will do including the old school Wiggy, but only in the hands of somebody with the training and experience to use it properly.

This gentleman needs a qualified electrician, regardless of cost. You cannot put a price on life safety. But to answer your question specifically, the metallic sheath has in many cases been used as a grounding conductor for upgrades to 3 hole receptacles, but in my electrical practice I don’t and won’t do it. The old cloth insulated wiring you speak of is more than likely compromised in enough places to warrant full replacement. I have analyzed many old wiring installations with a megohmmeter to verify insulation integrity and always find enough evidence to never trust it.

At the very least make sure the guy has the recommended minimum amount of smoke detectors in the home - one in each sleeping room as well as at least one additional in the common area of every floor of the home including basement and garage.

High input impedance digital meters do not load the circuit, a wiggy or test light does.

A non contact voltage detector picks up the field around an energized conductor and are subject to false positives. The field can bleed over to nearby conductors.

Depending on whether the cable haso a bond strip and the condition of the wiring will determine the next step.

???-- The only time my Fluke voltmeter gives any false readings is if it’s battery dies, and it doesn’t even turn on. My old Simpson 260 sweep meter is just as accurate.

It will accurately read voltage to 1/10 of a volt (AC), and has never failed me.

A voltmeter is the correct tool for any electrical job :cool:

Simpson 260 fine most of the time

Much lower input impedance.

Induced or phantom voltage from parallel conductors is the issue here.

BTW- good luck using your meter to troubleshoot boat trailer wiring. Different issue but just as misleading.

Greetings- There are a few ways it can be done and I will defer you to the areas of the National Electrical Code for those. However, I would expect you to use a voltmeter to make these tests. The only REAL test needed is to test the voltage between the two conductors. I would expect you to get anything within the range from 112V to 123V (can vary slightly from 120V Nominal).

Your friend is legally within his rights to do his own work, just be cautions and de-energize the circuit anytime he is working on it. Now, in terms of getting that receptacle an equipment grounding conductor you have two options but only one of them will will actually get you the GROUND he may desire.

(2) Non–Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where attachment to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(2)(a), (D)(2)(b), or (D)(2)©.

(a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with another non–grounding-type receptacle(s).
(b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interruptertype of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor
shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit interrupter type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacle.
© A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s) where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter.
Grounding-type receptacles supplied through the ground fault circuit interrupter shall be marked “GFCI Protected” and “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected between the grounding type receptacles.

or the following option :

© Nongrounding Receptacle Replacement or Branch
Circuit Extensions. The equipment grounding conductor
of a grounding-type receptacle or a branch-circuit extension
shall be permitted to be connected to any of the following:
(1) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode system
as described in 250.50
(2) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode conductor
(3) The equipment grounding terminal bar within the enclosure
where the branch circuit for the receptacle or
branch circuit originates
(4) An equipment grounding conductor that is part of another
branch circuit that originates from the enclosure
where the branch circuit for the receptacle or branch
circuit originates
(5) For grounded systems, the grounded service conductor
within the service equipment enclosure
(6) For ungrounded systems, the grounding terminal bar
within the service equipment enclosure

Based on their limited budget…I would go with this option and understand that you will not have the GROUND but you will have the safety.

(b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter type of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor
shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit interrupter type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacle.

Thanks everyone a electrician came in today and fixed the problems.

Glad to hear well done … Roy