Afci write up or not

Do you write up lack of gfci’s of code didn’t require it ? House built in 2009 , TN didn’t adopt the 2008 code until 2011

Yes. Because TREC made it a requirement for a time.

Code grandfatering applies to code enforcement, not home inspections. If it’s the current norm for safety, I would consider its absence reportable regardless of whether it was code required by the AHJ when the house was built. Same for GFCI.

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Thanks Chuck , what I was thinking .

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This was the homeowners work adding a sub-feed for his garage . He asked me how to fix it , I said you don’t … call an electrician

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Just think of it as a potential safety hazard and that leaves code out no matter the age of the home. :smile:

You said in the title “AFCI,” but in the body you said “GFCI.” I don’t write up the absence of AFCI’s on older homes, but always do on GFCI’s. Anyone else have thoughts?

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The following insert is all you need; just add all locations where you decide they are warranted by today’s standards. I also recommend them at floor outlets due to possible large spills, burst pipes, flooding, or carpet shampooing.

Safety / Improve:
Concerning GFCI’s: Regardless of local codes and what dates they were required and where; installing or repairing ground fault protection at the following locations is highly recommended:

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Good catch…I meant AFCIs but I suppose it applies to both.
To me, its like saying seatbelts weren’t mandated until 68 so anything prior to that is safe to drive without one.

Similar practice here. We note that they are not in place and that it is good practice to have them. In place. If asked further i tell them that i would recommend that they be installed and let the client decide.

We call out the lack of AFCI noting “that while they were not required at the time of construction they are now recommended for additional safety”. Then the home-buyer can make the choice.

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Regardless of local codes and what dates they were required and where; installing or repairing ground fault protection at the following locations is highly recommended:

I have similar wording which is permanently on my electrical page:
If there is no G.F.C.I. or A.F.C.I. protection present, it is recommended that it be installed in the appropriate areas, but may not be required by the local code.

I used to do the same, Bruce.

Today circuits are designed specifically for AFCI protection, in the past lighting was often mixed in with general wall outlets so suggesting AFCI upgrades is not as easily done as when upgrading for GFCI’s. With GFCI’s you can simply install a local outlet to comply, but today there is no such thing as a AFCI receptacle. Again a simple receptacle change out is something most homeowners can accomplish while I would never suggest a homeowner fuss with circuits in what is most likely a live panel.

Currently I don’t menton AFCI upgrades for older homes where not required by code.

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Great minds. :slight_smile:

Actually there are afci receptacles

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