Another question about heat pumps

Originally Posted By: Aaron Rosenbaum
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This may sound like a dumb question… but how can you tell the difference between a heat pump setup and a air conditioning/furnace setup? I’m still young, so I can ask dumb questions like this icon_biggrin.gif


Thanks for the help in advance.....


Originally Posted By: rray
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The best way to tell is if it says “Heat Pump” on it. Another way to tell is if the thermostat has an emergency setting on it. Unfortunately, neither is 100% certain depending on how things are hooked up.


There are probably some better, more technical ways, so I'll be tracking this thread.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: rking
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Cool my training books are coming in handy. Following are what it says:


1.) Look at the data plate, either Heat Pump or HP at start of model number–you got that one!


2.)If the thermostat has an Emergency Heat setting–you got that one too!


3.) Take the cover off the thermostat and if it is a two stage thermostat then it is a heat pump.


4.) If both Freon lines are insulated then it is a heat pump


5.)If you open the condenser cabinet and there is a reversing valve it is a heat pump


6.) If you find two expansion devices with bypasses it is a heat pump


7.)If the compressor is indoors and it is an air to air system, it is a heat pump


8.) If there is an outdoor thermostat connected to the wiring it is probably a heat pump


9.) You will like this one!—If it is winter and the unit is operating, it is a heat pump!!!


All answers courtesy of Carson, Dunlop & Associates Home Study System.


Hope it helps.


--
Muskoka Home Inspections
"Wisdom is the Anticipation of the Consequences"
Steering Committee Member At Large

Originally Posted By: rray
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Okay, I’m not a thermostat guy. What is a two-stage thermostat? Any nice pictures of it. Are there one-stage and three-stage thermostats?



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: rking
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Sorry Russell I have no pictures, in fact I personally have never seen an actual heat pump. Up here it would be basically useless, our long winters are really cold and our short summers are really hot, so we go from heating season to cooling season quite quickly.


But I do have an answer for you.


The two stages work this way: The first stage turns on the heat pump. The second stage turns on the back-up heat if the temperature continues to fall below the point that the heat pump can be effective.



Muskoka Home Inspections


“Wisdom is the Anticipation of the Consequences”


Steering Committee Member At Large

Originally Posted By: Mike Nelson
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Does the outside temp have to be at a certain level for the heat pump’s


A/C cycle to operate? I inspected a heat pump whose A/C was not working. Outside temp 70-75 degrees. T-stat read 80 and was set at 70. I made a note on the report. Several days later the client called and said the A/C was working. I stopped by to check it out and sure enough A/C was on. Only difference was that the outside temp was 80-85 degrees. ??? Not too many heat pumps in upstate NY!


Originally Posted By: Aaron Rosenbaum
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Thanks for the info…


I guess I won't see much of those up here in Minnesota, but if I move south, I will see those. Thanks again for the help ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

Also, what unit will the "Heat Pump" or "HP" be on? The outside unit or inside?

Also, will the inside unit have a gas manifold, etc in it and will it look just like a forced air furnace??


Originally Posted By: nlewis
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Aaron,


The HP will be on the exterior unit. Some older GE/ Trane units were marked Weathertron.
If the inside unit is an air handler only, there will be circuit breakers on the side of the cabinet for the strip heaters. These are usually at least 60 amps.
Some heat pump units are paired with gas warm air furnaces. Quite a few of this setup in NJ in condos. When the t-stat calls for heat, the circulator fan comes on instantly, even for the gas furnace. Sometimes the HP is disabled for heat and used for A/C only with this setup, at the request of the owner. I guess they don't like the constant running and the relatively low supply temp.


Originally Posted By: Aaron Rosenbaum
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Hmmmmmmmm… gotcha… icon_eek.gif


All this has got me thinking now

Thanks