Bathroom Non-Venting

Not sure where to put this, but I was on an inspection about a week ago and the question came up about bathroom ventilation. Toilet is in a separate room that can be closed off from the rest of the bathroom, which has both a shower and tub. The main part of the bathroom over the tub and shower did not have a vent or operable window.

IMO, both the toilet room and the main bathroom should have a vent, especially the main bathroom to remove humidity. But, I can’t find anything to support my argument. Any help would be much appreciated!

First two pictures are of the toilet room. Second pictures are of the rest of the bathroom.




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When the toilet room door is open the shower/tub area is no longer closed off, correct?

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What kind of support are you looking for? Modern code?

If you think the shower/bath area should be mechanically ventilated in addition to the water closet then you can say so.

However, if I do not see moisture issues, I typically say nothing.

You can go down the code rabbit hole if you wish, but it is a slippery slope.
image

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Correct, but it is on the opposite side of the room.

I don’t think I am necessarily looking for code, but maybe some kind of proverbial “leg to stand on” when explaining it to my client as to why another vent is needed.

Brian I tried to call you but your phone number on your website aint no good

Roy, I just sent you a direct message.

John, I would just state that a better way or “best practices” would have included ventilation in the tub/shower area to help remove moisture from that area. Although not wrong, the ventilation in the toilet closet will help, but is probably not as efficient as having two.

Leave it that, move on and let them decide.

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another vent might be nice , but it is not needed …You can recommend anything You want,requiring it is a different story

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Thank you brother it was a absolute pleasure talking to you

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Are we to inspect IAW, your IMO?

A window is a source of ventilation and considered by codes as ventilation.
How many open that window when they take a shower? Do we need to regulate people so they do? Can you determine this through a home inspection? If you see issues because of inadequate ventilation, by all means call it out.

I see a large crack under the interior doors. Does that allow some ventilation? How often is someone taking a shower and using the toilet for the entire duration?

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if You stuck the terlit in the shower You could do that…

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You could recommend that they replace the existing fan with a larger one that covers more CFM.

The bathroom vent is over the toilet so you can stand on the toilet to clean the grill!
smiley grad

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I have seen some of the recessed light fixtures have fans installed and are difficult to tell the fan is installed in them visually, did you listen for the motor running?
Here is one i googled

I would just recommend that they consider adding an additional vent to help control moisture.

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According to National Kitchen and Bath Association: “Plan a mechanical exhaust system, vented to the outside, for each enclosed area.”

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and none of that really matters… what does Your local building department say ?

Personally I do not answer to my local building department. I answer to my state licensing board and my clients. I base my opinions on a variety of sources not just local code.

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well then You go ahead and feel free to make Your job as difficult as possible then…it’s Your business to run as You see fit. Do You recommend carpet and drape colors as well?

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