Delta Kitchen faucets

Originally Posted By: dvalley
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Am I the only one to find that 85% of Delta (single handled) kitchen faucets to be defective in most homes?


Most of these faucets are leaking from the cam assembly area. The O-rings don?t seem to last more than a year (if you're lucky). You?d think Delta would improve their springs and O-rings, to last longer.

Anyone else see most of these as a problem?![](upload://2ubpHK3yn8KBPErH5FUvdHPsrJn.gif)


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David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: rmoore
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David…


When I remodelled my kitchen I installed a couple of faucets that ran me about $400 a piece. I would hope that the internals are better than a $30 model from HD. Yes, the leaks I have seen all seem to be on the cheap models (not keeping track off manufacturer). However, if the faucet is working without leaks, then, "at the time of inspection", they are all good and serving their purpose. Not sure where you were going with your question, but I don't want to have to start judging the quality or longevity of functional faucets.

I doubt if Delta is really any worse than other manufacturers that have a low-end line. Ya gets wot ya pay for!


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Gotta agree with you Dave. Deltas leak with our water around here usually within a year. Fisher Price (aka price pfister) also seem to leak quickly.


Seems the old Moens work forever 'round heya, and the Big Orange carries their parts too!


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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You got that nasty hard water down there Blaine? The sort that “furs” up the inside of kettles, etc.



Richard Moore


Rest Assured Inspection Services


Seattle, WA


www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Richard it’s so nasty down here the toilet flappers don’t last 6 months. My water heater went out at 3? years. The next day I went over to my parents house, and their’s was leaking. It was 5. Got back home and my neighbor called me and asked me if I knew how to put in a water heater. His was leaking, it was 2. A GE, A Ruud and an A.O. Smith.


Crummy stuff, this water ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


Originally Posted By: dbowers
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My darn kitchen faucet and my water heater both started leaking last week and neither one is even 30 years old yet. Cheap damn junk.


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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Not sure if Dan was being facetious or not, but his 30 year old (?) water heater raises a point I?ve been somewhat uncomfortable with in my reports. I was taught, and all the so-called life-span charts seem to agree, that the normal life expectancy of a water heater is 10 ? 12 years. When I see one at this age or beyond I have been recommending replacement as a preventative measure even if they appear to be externally pristine. The oldest one I have inspected so far was 38 years old (electric), and appeared to be fully functional without any external rusting (it did have a funky old TPR valve).


I am in a soft water area (basically snow-melt) and am wondering if these ?average? life expectancies, which I assume take into account more caustic water regions, are actually shorter than they need to be for my area. I have nothing against covering my butt when the heater is in an area that could cause water damage but, when in a garage or unfinished basement, I sometimes feel that I?m suggesting they discard a perfectly fine unit. I know the warranties run out at between 5 to 10 years, but those are probably also based on national conditions.

Anyone got any thoughts on this?

Sorry about the thread drift. Still seeking responses on Delta for David.


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: kwilliams
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Richard, since where drifting… I my basement is a gas water heater that was installed in 1982, I guess my well water is pretty good icon_wink.gif



Member - MAB


http://www.nachi.org/convention2006.htm

Originally Posted By: dvalley
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I’m not attempting to go anywhere (in particular) with this question. I just want to know why DELTA is the only faucet that I’m finding to be leaking in 85% of the homes they are installed in. The percentages of failed O-rings are high, in DELTA only. Other brands seem to have normal wear & tear.


When I find a leaky O-ring assembly, I always tell my clients that DELTA is not a high quality faucet. I’ll let them know that they can purchase a $3.00 upgrade kit (O-ring) in order to fix the leak or they can pay more money for a more efficient and quality faucet that will not leak in a year?s time.


I'm boycotting DELTA!![](upload://aJizSi1EuOt25dL2FR4AHt5AZ3G.gif)


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Quote:
When I see one at this age or beyond I have been recommending replacement as a preventative measure even if they appear to be externally pristine.


You recommend replacement because a piece of equipment is at it's rated lifespan??? What do you do in a 14 year old house with the original water heater, dishwasher, disposal and heat pump system?

Just curious ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Dave,


I think you've answered your own question. They're cheap faucets. The plumbers I have spoken to agree. Most don't like Delta or Fisher Price, oops, Price Pfister.

Cheap parts and a whole lotta advertising. They sell a bunch of faucets.


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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Blaine?


Actually I only recommend replacement for old water heaters when they are in a finished area, otherwise I use ?monitor for leaks? and ?budget for replacement? wording. As I said, I?m not totally comfortable with this. Dishwashers and Disposals? No...within reason, they?re either working or not. What?s a heat pump? ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)

Seriously though, what do you think should be said about a 14 year old water heater in a 3rd floor condo?


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: Bob Badger
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rmoore wrote:
Seriously though, what do you think should be said about a 14 year old water heater in a 3rd floor condo?





Click on Image ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


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Bob (AKA iwire)
ECN Discussion Forums
Mike Holt Code Forum

Originally Posted By: rmoore
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Thanks Bob…


Looks like it would be perfect for vacation homes especially. You got me googling for alarm only devices. The one below is only $12.75. Seems like cheap insurance.

![](upload://mtesCpMii9UTK4T2FfOJbP9eeXW.jpeg)
Click on image.


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: Bob Badger
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Richard


Many of the office spaces we do have break rooms all over the buildings.

Under the sink they will have a small electric water heater (not an insta hot) and usually the plans call for the alarm, or the auto shutoff. ![icon_cool.gif](upload://oPnLkqdJc33Dyf2uA3TQwRkfhwd.gif)


--
Bob (AKA iwire)
ECN Discussion Forums
Mike Holt Code Forum

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Quote:
Seriously though, what do you think should be said about a 14 year old water heater in a 3rd floor condo?


Now that I am in Florida I tell them they have to replace them if I see any rust on the cabinet, or if the water heater is over 5 years old because that seems to be the prevailing attitude down here. ![nachi_sarcasm.gif](upload://6HQh6KbNiD73gqTNQInjrR2zeJw.gif)

I would hope that the 14 year old water heater on the third floor is properly installed in an overflow pan with the drain leading outdoors. When I left VA, My buddy the AHJ said they were about to require shutoff valves installed in the overflow pans also. I don't know if they adopted that or not.

With any major item that is at it's life expectancy, I state that in my report. The water heater was eleven years old. The average operating life of an electric water heater is ten to twelve years. Plan for replacement. (or anticipate replacement, or save your bucks for replacement, etc.)

BTW, back on subject. I just did a 17 year old house this afternoon with all original Delta Faucets!!


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Since I have actually had the pleasure of owning both delta and fisher price faucets, I thought I would lend my two bucks worth.


It would seem that the problem is not entirely the fault of the faucet, but rather the person using the faucet. Many people tend to lean on those handles and being the chaeper models they just can not take the extra stress. Kids tend to exaggerate the problem and the most likely culprits for leaking faucets.

Before anyone gets started on me, I five of those 8 kids that I take care of are my own. Experience recommended but not required! ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: dbowers
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Richard - Dan was being silly but, 2 years ago his Dad replaced a 34 year old water heater, furnace, and A/C unit - none of these units was malfunctioning. Just for increased efficiency and as a prevention. Most 88 year old folks can’t afford to do that - so do we condemn the units, or just warn the buyers. If we condemn the units for being old - what about Dad!


"The 34 year old water heater is operational TODAY, but it has exceeded the normal lifespan for similar units. Extended usage should not be anticipated. Consider replacing it now or in the immediate future".

Dan Bowers


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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dbowers wrote:

"The 34 year old water heater is operational TODAY, but it has exceeded the normal lifespan for similar units. Extended usage should not be anticipated. Consider replacing it now or in the immediate future".


Now there's language I can live with! Thanks Dan, I really like that. Consider it stolen!


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com