Gas meter on a propane tank

I’ve never seen this or heard of this. I’m not saying there’s something wrong per se I’m just trying to figure out why it’s there why is there a gas meter on a propane tank? This tank only feeds this house it feeds the fireplace and cooktop and that’s it.


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I fully get that and I’ve help build houses with that style of setup before however this is a very rural property and this tank only services this house. The agent lives across the street and verified this tank only serves this house. Every other house is good 2000’ away

The home might have been rented at one point and that was a way on how much to charge for gas usage.
A 500 gallon LPG can last a long time for just those two appliances.

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Do you? Did you bother to read the entire page, or just skim through it?

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For anyone…is it common to have buried rubber LP pipe?

I’m hoping that is protection for the copper pipe. Given the OP’s area in the Oregon High Desert, I see a huge benefit to the rubber protection around the pipe.

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I do not know squat about hoses, but that looks like typical compression fitting I would see on my car engine rubber hoses.

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That probably is the temporary, construction hook up. It never was replaced with proper line and was instead buried. I have seen and called out this condition a few times. Not proper.

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Well, LP does stand for “Liquefied Petroleum gas”. :slight_smile:

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Does anyone know what the code is on the use of rubber line for LP between the tank and the low pressure regulator? I know rubber line is used by the delivery truck. In this residential use it is on the high pressure side of the fuel supply system. Rubber is subject to damage from sun and long term moisture contact. I’ve seen rubber lines a few times and call it out as a function and safety issue to be referred to the LP supply service technician. I have not asked this question to any of the LP service technicians who I know, but it is time.

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I know it’s not exactly the same, but nearly every LP gas grill I’ve ever seen has rubber hose connecting the tank to the regulator, or to the side burner. A few have flexible braided stainless hose.

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Probably a good call. I found this website which agrees with you.

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I used these for years in winter construction for temporary heat, but the lines were always above ground.
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Description

The Hot Max Model 24201 25 foot propane or natural gas extension/appliance hose is 350 PSI rated and is UL/CSA Listed. Industry standard 1/4-inch Male NPT x 1/4-inch Female Ball Seat Pipe Swivel all brass fittings. Works great with a wide variety of products including all Hot Max torches and most other weed burner torches. Also used as an extension hose for portable propane appliances like grills, turkey fryers, and lots of other camping/RV equipment. Although the hose is rated for natural gas, due to the relatively small diameter of the hose and low pressure of natural gas, this used can only be used for relatively small appliances requiring less than 40,000 BTU. TIP: 1/4 - Inch Female Flared B (also called a Ball Seat Female Pipe Swivel Fitting) is not exactly the same as a 1/4” female NPT fitting. Our female fittings have a brass cone on the inside which helps seal the connection without the use of teflon tape or pipe dope. If you need an adapter for use with NPT fittings, use Hot Max Model 28100 Ball Socket to NPT adapter to convert the female end of these hoses to male NPT fitting. (1) one ball socket to NPT adpater is included.

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Doubt it’s rubber, they even put a tracer wire in… Honeywell Servi-sert makes a riser that looks like in the OP’s pic:


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Sure looks like that is what they used Simon.


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Here is a different company;
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Note: This product should be installed by a licensed gas fitter.

Con-Flex risers are flexible casings that protect yellow PE pipe aboveground. Con-flex risers consist of CSST flex hose, with a durable UV & weather-resistant outer sleeve. Conforms to NFPA 54 & 58.

Yep… at least until they get walked into the mud. :laughing:

No mud in the winter time in masonry shelters.

It’s not rubber, it’s Neoprene.

Neoprene, also known as polychloroprene, is one of the first synthetic rubber products ever made . Developed in 1930 by a DuPont company scientist, neoprene is generally stronger and harder than natural rubber and more resistant to water, oils and solvents.