Hail damage

Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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dfrend wrote:
You are right, but as in the quote from the textbook, minimal loss such as that caused by any storm has
Quote:
minimal to no impact on the life expectancy of the roof covering.


It is normal wear. That is my point. Granular loss is NOT damage. Roofs wear, fast or slow. There is no way to prevent it. And that granular loss will have no more impact on the life of the roof than any other storm.


Correct...not "damage", but the homeowner may have to replace the 25 year shingle sooner than 25 years!
In the report, I didn't mention "damage" at all...just that the overall life expentancy had been reduced.

Just posing the question here, but if it's considered "normal wear" and the shingle doesn't last per the warrantied 20-25 years, are the mfgrs. then liable for warranty or will they say it was storm damage?


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Originally Posted By: dedwards
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At the risk of flogging a dead horse…I read and for the life of me can not find it or I would post it here. The number one reason giving for premature shingle failure is improper ventilation in the attics. The extreme heat over a period of time eccelerates the demise of the roof by the shingles being too hot for too long, softening up the adhesive on the roof, loosening the granular material which then is more easily removed by the normal wear and tear of the wind, rain and flocks of wild buzzards roosting on the ridge. I have installed a few roofs and on a hot day you can remove the granular material just by twisting your shoe on it. The shingles get very flexible and soft. Any time I see copious amounts of granular material in the gutters and/or at the base of the downspouts it is a sure sign the roof surface is shedding the protective material. I believe it is more common in the areas where the summers are long and hot and how many of us have been in attics where the temperature is hovering at 140 degrees. If I can find the “professional data” I will post it.


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Heres a useful inspection guide for shingles put out by certainteed…the last paragraph describes hail damage and granual loss.


It's just a good guide to help out during roof inspections.

http://www.certainteed.com/NR/rdonlyres/5416D259-EA40-4AB9-A0D3-79FDE97F0987/0/20_20_1430.pdf


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Originally Posted By: dfrend
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Quote:
Just posing the question here, but if it's considered "normal wear" and the shingle doesn't last per the warrantied 20-25 years, are the mfgrs. then liable for warranty or will they say it was storm damage?


You need to read up on the warranties. The shingles are miscalled 25, 30 50 year shingles. The fact is they will not last that long under most climatic conditions. How could they possibly warrantee a shingle in a cool climate the same as one in a hot climate. They are warranteed agianst "manufacturing defects" for the period specified, not from wearing out sooner than that period. It is a common misconception that a shingle called a "30 year shingle" will actually last 30 years. It may, but chances are you will replace at 20-25.


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Daniel R Frend
www.nachifoundation.org
The Home Inspector Store
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Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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You’re correct…I need to read up on them as I never have. Thanks for the info. icon_cool.gif


Kevin


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Originally Posted By: jrice
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Back to the original question, I do not have a picture but I just had my roof replaced last year due to hail damage. What the insurance adjuster looked for was dented roof vents and/or gutters. Then they look at the shingles themselves. On the edges of the shingles you could actually see the fiberglass strands hanging or poking out. They were small and hard to see at first. Then for that to be significant, more than 30% of the shingles in a 10 sq. ft. area must be damaged. According to the adjuster hail usually does not damage the center of the shingle.


I hope this helps,
Jeff


Originally Posted By: rrushing
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/Haildamage1.jpg ]


Originally Posted By: dedwards
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Good photo…sorry I can help you with one…like I said earlier where I’m at if and when it does hail it is so small it just looks like its raining grits.


Originally Posted By: cmardian
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The feedback from all of you has been great. Thank you. Some of the photos were really good and I have saved them all. Thanks again.


Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi to all,


Nice picture, you can pretty well see several hail impact points on that shot.

regards

Gerry


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Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: dfrend
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I am just glad I am not doing hail inspections anymore icon_biggrin.gif . After the Tornados in La Plata, MD and College Park, we had thousands of homes hit by hail that accompanied the tornados. I did about 3 or 4 hail inspections a day. Siding, A/C units, gutters, vents, shingles. Somebody was wondering why their HO insurance was so high on another thread. Maybe because people like me were paying out up to $20k a day.



Daniel R Frend


www.nachifoundation.org


The Home Inspector Store


www.homeinspectorstore.com