Mold remediation

(system) #1

I recently had a mold remediation company come out to scrub the floor joists in my crawl space to remove mold. When I went into the crawl space to see what they had done, I realized they didn't scrub it at all! All they did was fog the crawl space. At that time I noticed that all of the insulation was wet throughout the whole crawl space. When I spoke to the owner of the company he informed me that he would send out another crew to scrub all the floor joists down, he said he would be there to supervise them this time. He told me that they would take the insulation down and scrub the joist, I asked him about the wet insulation and he told me that there was no way that they were responsible for the insulation being wet, he said it was from condensation on one of the pipes. I could possibly see how the insulation might be wet near that pipe but not the whole crawl space.
Two days prior to them coming out, I know for a fact that the insulation was bone dry because I was in there for hours wiping down the joist myself. Can over-application of fogging cause moisture or pooling on the insulation? Any advice would be greatly appreciated, I'm just so frustrated. Thank you.

(James E. Braun, CMI) #2

No, not if they are fogging right.

Secondly, fogging is not excepted in the mold industry as a correct way to remove mold. I take it they are not certified. A standard needs to be followed such as the IICRC S520 Second Edition, so no problems such as you mentioned happens.

(ldapkus1) #3

I recommend you consult an industrial hygienist that specializes in mold remediation. Try this link
http://www.forensic-applications.com/
Go with the professionals.

(Stephen Lagueux) #4

The whole crawl space should have been sealed and kept under negative air pressure. Media blasting such as dry ice blasting or soda blasting is usually the proper way to remove mold on wood such as in a crawl space but it would be expensive. Other technics such as sanding or scrubing could work too depending on the amount of mold to be removed. No spraying of any liquid should ever be used on mold as it would aerosolize spores. Everything should be hepa vaccumed several times, all depends on the remediation protocole.

(Cameron Anderson) #5

What they describe as fogging may not be what occurred. The fact that they blame a water pipe and condensation for saturating the insulation indicates they are either lying to cover themselves or they do not understand building science and are unqualified for their current profession. I agree with Linus, find a professional, not a four day trained remediator crew.

(James H. Bushart) #6

[quote="ldapkus1, post:3, topic:79144"]

I recommend you consult an industrial hygienist that specializes in mold remediation. Try this link
http://www.forensic-applications.com/
Go with the professionals.
[/QUOTE]

Good advice. Let a professional inspect and advise you before accusing anyone of lying to you and discrediting yourself in advance of any additional responses you may wish to make in the future.

Good luck.

(system) #7

[quote="slagueux, post:4, topic:79144"]

The whole crawl space should have been sealed and kept under negative air pressure. Media blasting such as dry ice blasting or soda blasting is usually the proper way to remove mold on wood such as in a crawl space but it would be expensive. Other technics such as sanding or scrubing could work too depending on the amount of mold to be removed. No spraying of any liquid should ever be used on mold as it would aerosolize spores. Everything should be hepa vaccumed several times, all depends on the remediation protocole.
[/QUOTE]

On the contrary, spraying a area (depends on the area) does reduce airborne spores.
Done properly.

(system) #8

[quote="slagueux, post:4, topic:79144"]

The whole crawl space should have been sealed and kept under negative air pressure. Media blasting such as dry ice blasting or soda blasting is usually the proper way to remove mold on wood such as in a crawl space but it would be expensive. Other technics such as sanding or scrubing could work too depending on the amount of mold to be removed. No spraying of any liquid should ever be used on mold as it would aerosolize spores. Everything should be hepa vaccumed several times, all depends on the remediation protocole.
[/QUOTE]

On the contrary, spraying a areas (depends on the area) does reduce airborne spores.
Done properly. Application of a cleaning agent for for scrubbing is done this way prior to scrubbing.