Radon Testing Multi-Unit Properties

Does anyone know if there is a minimum requirement of Radon tests that need to be conducted in a multi-unit property? I have a new build condo complex with 41 units and am told they all have crawlspaces. I’ve seen some earlier posts referencing a few standards, however, my client wants to be sure to meet EPA requirements. I’ll be using calibrated Continuous monitors.

Who is your client?
How many CS will you be testing… 1…all?
Are the CS sectioned off or continuous?

Thanks for the quick reply Jeffrey. The client is the developer. The question is how many units are required to be tested to meet EPA standards. As far as I can tell, each unit is a separate dwelling. 41 total units and all units are vacant.

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Where are you placing the test at? In each unit, or in the lowest level (CS)?

Good question? As far as I can tell, according to MAMF-2017_Rev1-21, I need to test the lowest level of “intended to be occupied” living space in each unit, and at least 1 and not less than 10% of the same type of spaces in upper floors. Still sorting through all the factors. For example if there are 10 separate units connected side by side, all with a 2nd floor and 5 with a 3rd floor, it sounds like I to need to test at least 1 unit on the second floor and at least 1 unit on the 3rd floor.

What does your state require? There is no federal mandate for testing, each state adopts or writes their own requirements or not at all in some cases.

EPA recommends testing all homes below the third floor.

If your state lacks specific requirements (Colorado has no specific Radon testing requirements) you can either do each of the units (41 tests) or a random sampling of units (less than half - say 14). You would need to reach an agreement with your client. Testing all 41 units would be costly and time consuming. A better alternative would be a random sampling of units (let the client pick the units).

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Thanks everyone. Good advice. I think I’m on the right track now.

Do yourself and your client a favor… ditch the CRM’s and go with Professional Charcoal Canisters!

I used these for years before I got out of the Radon game. Ignore the price shown. Sign up with them and they cost half of that.

Ship them back bulk USPS Priority. Results back same day they receive them!

Cut your client a deal on testing every unit… He can use that to his favor. No complaints or legal issues with tenants/buyers. EVERY unit tested. He is free and clear!

Example:
Cost: Kit and bulk shipping approx $30.00 ea
Sell: 50 tests x $130.00 each = $6,500.00
GP: $5,000.00 or cut him a better deal. Lot’s of money on the table.

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This is the standards you should follow for residential buildings exceeding four units: AARST/ANSI Standards

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Remember… like Codes… those standards are only the bare MINIMUM. They are NOT codes. They are just suggested guidelines by an organization that the States were sold a bill of goods by. Kinda like the NHIE.

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True, but the client wants EPA Guidelines/SOP and @msenty posted the newest version for multi-family.

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Yes, and it seems that the EPA has also bought into accepting AARST as their standards provider.

Radon Standards of Practice | US EPA

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Seems pretty simple with cannisters…none of those pesky dupes and calibration :grinning:

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Charcoal cannisters and Electrets both require duplicates within 4 inches.

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Which is why the link I posted above to RTCA canisters is for a ‘set of two’ for Professionals use.

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Why spend millions on setting your own standards when you can get a private company to do it? That way you will have millions more to waste on internal DOJ investigations done by an independent counsel that amount to little more than a cover up.

It is called “outsourcing.” Now if we could only ‘outsource’ the Presidency.
confused-animated-smiley

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DEP/NRPP quality assurance requirements:

“Duplicate tests are required for every 10% of tests deployed” meaning every 10th test requires a duplicate.

and don’t forget blanks:

“Blank tests are required for every 20% of tests deployed” meaning every 20th test requires a blank.

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This is probably the one circumstance I would endorse charcoal over CRM. Being able to do 41 tests simultaneously would be way better than going back over and over to move monitors. One thing to consider though for those in licensed states, you will likely need to add charcoal canisters to your QA plan and list of devices prior to doing the testing.

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Time saving Tip: Remember, for every test location you set, you will need to fill out a COC (Chain of Custody) form, and when placing multiple tests, it can get quite tedious! Just the required section for your companies information gets ‘old’ really fast. So… when you receive your first kit, remove the supplied COC Form, and measure the area that contains your information. Purchase a package of Avery Labels close to that size, and create a template to print your information on the label sheets. Takes a little bit to get the layout just right (print on regular paper first until just right, don’t waste labels testing), but worth the extra work to save a butt-load of time filling out forms!

Here’s a sample of my old ones (form size and format may have changed over the years)…

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Absolutely the way to go. I did a 35K SF office building about 7 years ago, which had a full basement with offices, meeting rooms, and the mechanical rooms. One end of the building was built into a hillside, and so they requested Radon testing. I used a total of 21 test kits. Took me about an hour to set all the tests and fill in the locations on the COC forms (see my post above). Returned three days later on the day of inspection, packaged everything up, and drove one mile to ship them out USPS priority mail. Had my results back in two days… before I had completed the inspection report!
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