'Structural Issues for Home Inspectors' course

(Ben J. Gromicko) #1

This open, public forum thread is dedicated exclusively for those students currently enrolled in the InterNACHI free, online Structural Issues for Home Inspectors Course.

Students are free to pose questions and comments here and join in the conversation with other students. The thread will be monitored by the course program manager.

Students may:

  • write essays;
  • discuss topics;
  • ask questions; and
  • share thoughts with other students.

Click here to return to the course's assignment slide.

Feel free to scroll through these posts or jump to the last post.

Thank you.

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(Ian Buchanan) #2

Hello everyone
In the past I have taken many courses in community colleges in Ontario, Canada and have learned lots of good stuff but I have to say I am learning so much more with INTERnachi. I find I retain the information much better and the exam questions are not all about tricking you. I am actually enjoying being a member.

Ian.B.:D

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(Bobby Hamilton, CMI) #3

[quote="ibuchanan, post:2, topic:60030"]

Hello everyone
In the past I have taken many courses in community colleges in Ontario, Canada and have learned lots of good stuff but I have to say I am learning so much more with INTERnachi. I find I retain the information much better and the exam questions are not all about tricking you. I am actually enjoying being a member.

Ian.B.:D
[/quote]

Welcome aboard Ian, you'll find that this message board is a wealth of info, just don't be afraid to ask.

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(Robert B. Rebera, CMI) #4

There is a tremendous amount of information and many things that I thought I knew, that I did not know or just forgot.

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(William S. Carr) #5

Ben, hello.....
I'm going to take your Structural Course now, see how this goes......
Have a different opinion on several questions......Weep hole spacing, length of a cantilever, max lot slope, and a couple of others...No biggie, just leave the structural to guys like me.
Your friend, William S Carr, Jr. PE, CGC

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(Ben J. Gromicko) #6

[quote="wcarr, post:5, topic:60030"]

Ben, hello.....
I'm going to take your Structural Course now, see how this goes......
[/quote]

Okay.
Keep us informed.

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(Peter A. Farrell) #7

Peter Farrell

I am starting a home inspection business and want to be able to do the best inspections for my clients. Making sure their home is sound and sturdy is one of the items on an inspectors check list. As in all homes, the foundation is most importent.

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(Ben J. Gromicko) #8

[quote="pfarrell, post:7, topic:60030"]

Peter Farrell

I am starting a home inspection business and want to be able to do the best inspections for my clients. Making sure their home is sound and sturdy is one of the items on an inspectors check list. As in all homes, the foundation is most importent.
[/quote]

Welcome, Peter.

Here's a good video about inspecting the structure of a house http://www.nachi.tv/structural/structural-inspection.htm. NACHI.TV is free for all InterNACHI Members.

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(Richard L. Overton) #9

Hey Ben, there is some conflicting information about the clearance from soil in crawl spaces between the drawings and text content in the course. One reference 12 and 18 inches, the other 18 and 24 inches.

Additionally, I thought all garage fire walls separating the house from an attached garage had to be a minimum of 5/8 type X. Perhaps this is just in California.

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(James Stephan) #10

hello - i've been negligent in completing the requirements for membership this year. I have however, been taking the classes and exams as I can get them done. My renovation business has been steady and has been keeping me busy. I have not had any calls for home inspection, but I've been spreading the word to people I know and meet - it will happen.

Question - do I have to be a Nachi member to remain licensed in Florida, or can I join another organization that's certified? thanks - js

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(Joe Farsetta) #11

Bill,

[QUOTE]
No biggie, just leave the structural to guys like me.

[/QUOTE]

No disrespect intended, but I work day in-day out with AE firms. I see some of the most incompetent designs coming out of these firms, and specifically from those with PE licenses. Designs are clearly flawed, with some to a degree which is mind-boggling. I am actually beginning to go after a number of them via those in charge of professional licensing and through their E&O carriers.

So, when I see a comment such as the one you made above, I have to believe that your intention is noble, but your ego may get the best of you. Even with regard to structural engineers, some are quite slopppy and un-disciplined in their approach and work product. Please pardon my skepticism when it comes to your alleged prowess and that of those with real-world experience in OUR profession.

I see you are a PE. What is your specific degree in, civil or structural. Does your practice revolve around the residential, commercial, or industrial arenas. How much experience do you actially posess, and why the hell would you ever want to be a HI if yoou are a PE?

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(Steven C. Winchester) #12

I appereciate all the info offered by InterNachi. It has been very helpful.

Steve Winchester

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(Lance Berens) #13

I think I have to make a post here to continue to the course...

so, here it is.

:mrgreen:

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(Leonard Inkster, CMI) #14

This should be an interesting exercise for me as after 20+ years renovation of old homes I am simultaneously finding I have to take Structural Courses both for NACHI and CAHPI, so comparison of the NACHI to Carson Dunlop should be interesting with respect to what is needed for Inspections and what is just ancillary fluff.

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(Leonard Inkster, CMI) #15

Attention to spelling needs to be tightened up. In the Walls & Ceilings section, are the external walls not load bearing also?

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(Ben J. Gromicko) #16

[quote="linkster, post:15, topic:60030"]

Attention to spelling needs to be tightened up. In the Walls & Ceilings section, are the external walls not load bearing also?
[/QUOTE]

Thanks Leonard.
If you can send me specific corrections/edits needed, I'll ship you some free goodies.
ben@internachi.org
Thanks.

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(Leonard Inkster, CMI) #17

Zoiks, I need to get back into the course, how do I do that?

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(Ben J. Gromicko) #18

[quote="linkster, post:17, topic:60030"]

Zoiks, I need to get back into the course, how do I do that?
[/QUOTE]

Log in:
http://www.nachi.org/structuralcoursereleased2007.htm

( And we also have:
http://www.nachi.tv/structural/structural-inspection.htm free to Members. )

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(Leonard Inkster, CMI) #19

Observe and Report
The course improves the hom inspector's.... (I think it should be home :) )
Common Structural terms
**Slope *definition states: . It's typically reported as the number of inches of rise for every foot of run, should that be inches of rise for every inch of run?
**Examination
*
In the examination we are asked what is the most common foundation type. The answer is Slab-on-grade, but this needs to be better queries as the most-common in the U.S. In Canada it is rare to find slab-on-grade for residential homes. Most have full basements, with a lesser amount of Crawl Spaces and very few slab-on-grade which is normally reserved for commercial properties.
Crawl Space Construction
**The diagram indicates grade heights of 24" below bottom of floor joists and 18" below the beams, but the wording says the minimum should be 18" and 12" respectively. I'm not sure the exam matches the wording, and distinguishes between minimum heights and "some code heights".
**Truss Uplift

The wording talks about roofing trusses arching upwards, and it not being a structural issue, but the picture seems to show a wall drop on a floor?? Confusing to say the least. :)

In the Inspecting a Deck Illustrated attachment (yes I did read it all) in the "Pick test" paragraph it says "The inspector should first try the pick test in an area where the wood is known to be sound to deterimine a "control".
*Later in the section about Ledger boards, and Aluminum flashing it says *"
Contact with pressure-treated wood or galvinized fasteners can lead to rapid corrosion of aluminum."

That's all I picked up on this one, although I did notice on John McKeena's excellent PDF Introduction to IR Thermography he mentioned that "Viewing from different Angels can effect emissivity" I don't employ any Angels, but I am married to one, does that count? :)

Also, in the course it might be worth adding the Parge coating cracks or crumbling can also be caused by poor building practices where the Parge coat is not sticky enough. (i.e. they use mortar mix instead of Portland/Sand mix) or it is applied too thickly and it drops off after it dries.

Other than that, I've found all the information supplied to be exemplary, useful, and given the amount of work that's gone into this library of relevant and informational service I've found precious few errors. (Aside from the U.S. English vs. Canadian English for which you are entirely forgiven :) )

I look forward to completing the rest of the courses.

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(Marcel R. Cyr, CMI) #20

I thought it was a very good course when I took it.

Good job Ben and all that contributed to the course. :)

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