Un-grounded wiring with three prong outlets

This still didnt answer my question. Is it a good idea to put a gfi breaker in for houses which have switched two prong outlets to a three prong? I understand that u could put a gfi on the first outlet in the series but most homeowners dont even know what outlets are on which breakers anyway. Or is it pointless since the outlets still will not have a ground.

Yes it is a good idea to Put in GFCI protection .
Houses all had no ground for 60~ years .

Although not a replacement for having an EGC in the circuit GFCI protection is better than no protection at all. Also given the use of double insulated power cords there isn’t a great deal of three prong grounded items used in the average home anyway.

3 prong plugs can be modified to work in 2 prong receptacles for a fraction of the cost of the suggested repairs posted here.

That is why an electrician should do the work and not a homeowner

Here are your options:

(D) Replacements. Replacement of receptacles shall comply
with 406.4(D)(1) through (D)(6), as applicable.
(1) Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where a grounding
means exists in the receptacle enclosure or an equipment
grounding conductor is installed in accordance with
250.130©, grounding-type receptacles shall be used
and shall be connected to the equipment grounding conductor
in accordance with 406.4© or 250.130©.
(2) Non–Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where attachment
to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the
receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with
(D)(2)(a), (D)(2)(b), or (D)(2)©.
(a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted
to be replaced with another non–grounding-type receptacle(s).
(b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted
to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter type
of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked
“No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor
shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit interrupter-
type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the
ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.
© A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted
to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s)
where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter.
Grounding-type receptacles supplied through the ground fault
circuit interrupter shall be marked “GFCI Protected”
and “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding
conductor shall not be connected between the grounding type
receptacles.

Thanks everyone for the information. It seems the concensus is it is slightly helpful but the last resort versus other options.

What do u suggest?

So willfully removing a safety feature is preferable to adding gfi protection? I hope I missed the sarcasm.

Clinton, I think this is the answer you seem to be looking for, in a nutshell:

It is better to have a GFCI outlet where are there are two pronged outlets (if you can’t ground it). The GFCI outlet should come with a sticker that says “ungrounded outlet”, and should be affixed to the outlet cover. This will make it pass code. It will then protect a person, but not a computer, or big screen TV, that needs to be grounded. These should only be used on a grounded outlet.

Easy Peezy :smiley: