AFCI requirement for manufactured homes 2019

I inspected a manufactured home (double wide) today that was set up in May 2019. The owner has had problems with the roof leaking, mold and an unusual number of ceiling cracks so he wanted a full home inspection. Long story short I noted there were no AFCI’s. Is there a different standard for manufactured homes when it comes to AFCI’s? I read online that they were not required a few years back but are now required the same as stick built homes. I would appreciate any input on the matter. Thanks.

First, Michael, welcome to our forum. There are no stupid questions. We are all learning here. :smile:

Regarding the AFCIs, I would consider those lacking to be a potential safety hazard and report it as such. That keeps me away from codes and the arguments that can pop up depending on what code, year of adoption, etc., etc. JMHO

CHAPTER XX—OFFICE OF ASSISTANT
SECRETARY FOR HOUSING—FEDERAL
HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF
HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Subpart I—Electrical Systems § 3280.801 Scope.

In addition to the requirements of
this part and Part II of Article 550 of
the National Electrical Code (NFPA
No. 70–2005), the applicable portions of
other Articles of the National Electrical
Code must be followed for electrical
installations in manufactured
homes. The use of arc-fault breakers
under Articles 210.12(A) and (B), 440.65,
and 550.25(A) and (B) of the National
Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70–2005 is
not required. However, if arc-fault
breakers are provided, such use must
be in accordance with the National
Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70–2005.
Wherever the requirements of this
standard differ from the National Electrical
Code, these standards apply

This is something I found supposedly quoting the 2017 NEC:
550.25 – Mobile Homes
AFCI protection for mobile homes mirror the AFCI requirements for dwellings in 210.12.
AFCIs provide protection against electrical fires. Make sure they are working properly by testing them every month.

Here is a link to where I found it:

They should have been installed.

Precisely! LOL! LOL! LOL!

They are not required.

https://www.howtolookatahouse.com/Blog/Entries/2019/2/are-arc-fault-circuit-interrupter-afci-breakers-required-in-mobilemanufactured-homes.html

In addition to the requirements of this part and Part II of Article 550 of the National Electrical Code (NFPA No. 70-2005), the applicable portions of other Articles of the National Electrical Code must be followed for electrical installations in manufactured homes. The use of arc-fault breakers under Articles 210.12(A) and (B), 440.65, and 550.25(A) and (B) of the National Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70-2005 is not required. However, if arc-fault breakers are provided, such use must be in accordance with the National Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70-2005. Wherever the requirements of this standard differ from the National Electrical Code, these standards apply.

NFPA 70
National Electrical Code®

550.25 Arc­ Fault Circuit ­Interrupter Protection.
(A) Definition. Arc­f ault circuit interrupters are defined in Article 210.12(A).
(B) Bedrooms of Mobile Homes and Manufactured Homes. All branch circuits that
supply 125 ­volt, single ­phase, 15­ and 20­ ampere outlets installed in bedrooms of mobile
homes and manufactured homes shall be protected by arc­fault circuit interrupter(s).

Thanks everyone for your quick replies. It has been a valuable learning experience. I found the statements in the 2017 NEC and 3280.801 on govreg.com. So the 2017 NEC says that manufactured homes should have the same AFCI requirements as other dwellings but HUD or other governmental housing agencies do not require it. Thanks again for the references and links.

Like you Larry, I never use the word “code” in my reports. But it is nice to know what is and is not safe.

Exactly :smiley:

Because one code may say it is not required doesn’t make it absolutely safe, however.

Larry, safety was not the question in the OP. It was a question. Safety is not being argued here.

I brought it up as an example, for the OP, of a narrative because: "That keeps me away from codes and the arguments that can pop up depending on what code, year of adoption, etc., etc. JMHO"

Agreed Larry. Regardless of what the code says, if something is or appears to be unsafe, I point it out to my clients.

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Depending in what city you’re in down here, if there is a required permit to change out a CBP, let’s say in the city of Boca Raton, the new rule is you must install AFCI’s if there aren’t any.
This brings the fee up to another $800-1200.

I always recommend them no matter what.

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Manufactured homes are built to HUD letters, not the single family home building code. I have never actually found anything referring to arc fault for manufactured home. I do mention after 2006 if there’s no arc fault protection in bedrooms, I mentioned this is a recommendation for an upgrade. I could be incorrect, manufactured homes are a complete different breed.

Don’t mistake requirements for Manufactured Housing for Modular, the requirements are different.


I just try to stay away from using the word “code”.

If it is a potential safety hazard after 2006, it is a potential safety hazard before that date, too.

So, call it an upgrade because it is a potential safety hazard. :smile:

HUD 3280.801 (b) In addition to the requirements of
this part and Part II of Article 550 of
the National Electrical Code (NFPA
No. 70–2005), the applicable portions of
other Articles of the National Electrical
Code must be followed for electrical
installations in manufactured
homes. The use of arc-fault breakers
under Articles 210.12(A) and (B), 440.65,
and 550.25(A) and (B) of the National
Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70–2005 is
not required. However, if arc-fault
breakers are provided, such use must
be in accordance with the National
Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70–2005.
Wherever the requirements of this
standard differ from the National Electrical
Code, these standards apply.