Backsplash Sealant Question.

(Jamie Kelly) #1

I don’t know the name of this type of back splash material or who the manufacturer is so I’m having a hard time trying to determine whether it is supposed to be sealed at the countertop. It’s grouted in (right?) so would that be considered sealant? Any input would be much appreciated.

(Barry Adair, TREC#4563 EIFSTX#39) #2

that’s no grout dry stack material
anyone caulking will make a non-food area surface abortion install worse
advise client of the bacteria risk & to not allow water-liquid-food penetration & move on
depending on cleaning habits, after a few food poisoning events to the er they’ll figure it out

(Douglas Cossar, CMI. NHI) #3

I might mention it to the client, in passing… but, having said that, what is the big deal? This would, IMHO, not be considered significant. It’s surly not a issue for the safety of the occupants nor would it have a significant bearing on the value of the home.

Keep in mind that there is no such thing as a perfect home and we as home inspectors should not expect that there is.
I have said it before, and got some schit for it but I say pay more attention to things that really matter.

Cheers

(Joshua L. Frederick) #4

Stone, tile, whatever…2 hard surface abutment should be caulked with a flexible sealant
https://www.hunker.com/12003678/how-a-tile-backsplash-meets-with-a-granite-counter-top

(James F. McKee) #5

it’s dry stacked stone with no grout trying to seal one joint would seem useless

(Larry Kage, CMI) #6

No kidding, Jim…not to mention what might be growing in the porous material. :shock:

(Jamie Kelly) #7

I understand that the backsplash itself won’t be sealed but my concern is water on the countertop being able to run under the stacked material and damage the materials behind and under the sink. Normally if the sealant between the countertop and backsplash is missing or deteriorated, I recommend it being resealed.

What I would like to know is if the grout or thinset behind stacked material normally sufficient to prevent, or at least slow water penetration enough that normal amounts of water splashed onto the counter behind the sink won’t run into the cabinet under the sink? I have watched and read multiple installation videos and directions for these materials but haven’t come across anything specifically referring to sealant along the countertops. I understand that visually there is no way to confirm what is behind the backsplash but looking for general application standards.

(Larry Kage, CMI) #8

Jamie, you may want to just recommend sealing that joint to prevent water intrusion and damage…a CYA thing for your thinking. :slight_smile:

(John Olson) #9

What would the manufacturer suggest?

(Joe Funderburk, CMI) #10

How would you propose that he determine the manufacturer?

(John Olson) #11

Installer or the store it was purchased

(Joe Funderburk, CMI) #12

So the home inspector is supposed to be the backspace detective?