Copper against copper corrosion

Originally Posted By: jbilski
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Home has copper water piping. In basement water lines are secured with copper hangers. Major corrosion (green/crusty) where the piping meets the hangers. So much so, that they are all fused together. Any ideas why this would happen with two similar metals…copper against copper?


Thanks,
John


Originally Posted By: tallen
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John do you have a picture?



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: jbilski
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.






sorry having trouble getting it to show up.


Originally Posted By: jbilski
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Image: http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/copper.JPG ]


Here is a photo. All piping throughout basement secured in the same manner. Like I mentioned, hangers fused to piping. Home is 15 years old.


Originally Posted By: jdigiacomo
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Just a guess, but is it possible someone tried to solder the hangers to the pipe and did not wipe the flux?


Originally Posted By: tallen
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Thats what it looks like to me too John


Strange that someone would solder the two together.



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: tallen
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Now I just need to get someone to check my spelling and grammer. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: rmoore
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Maybe to try to stop the pipes rattling?



Richard Moore


Rest Assured Inspection Services


Seattle, WA


www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi to all,


I think you guys are on the wrong track, when I looked at the photo (after a 10 min down-load ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif) ) what I saw was what I believe to be a copper plated steel hanger, the lower part of which is showing significant rusting (look at the scaling typical for steel). I think that what has happened over the years is that vibration on the pipes wore through the copper plating to the point that moisture was able to start to act on the steel, both rusting the hanger, and producing a galvanic reaction between the 2 dissimilar metals.

here it is at a more managable size:



Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: jwortham
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Gerry,


Nice catch. No wonder I always make it a point to read your messages.


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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Looks like rust and solder…


![](upload://p3j2jgICA2dHx5WiFg2AC3m9Xp9.jpeg)

Let's all get together and buy Gerry a DSL line.


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: jpeck
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I think Gerry has nailed it. First give-a-way was those wire hangers, if plain copper, then would tend to bend flat when driven in. They would need to be cast copper or brass to not crush, or copper coated steel, and they are not ‘cast’ anything, but drawn wire and bent into the hanger and spike shape.


I think the silver / white stuff is corrosion powder, where the pipe may be getting ready to leak through.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: jbilski
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Thanks for your help guys!


I think maybe the black plastic clamps are the way to go. How about the rest of you?

Thanks again,
John


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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I…I…I agree Gerry “nailed” it … icon_lol.gif



Robert O’Connor, PE


Eagle Engineering ?


Eagle Eye Inspections ?


NACHI Education Committee


I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: tallen
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Damn you guys ar good!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: jpope
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Well John, I guess you got your answer icon_wink.gif



Jeff Pope


JPI Home Inspection Service


“At JPI, we’ll help you look better”


(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: jsavino
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I vote for flux that was not wiped off.



John Savino


HomeWorks Inspection Services, LLC


St. James, NY


631.379.4241

Originally Posted By: jsavino
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Look at the picture again, the pipe hangers are made from two different matierals. Thats why there is rust. Flux is an acid made to etch into the copper to bond the solder and the cooper for a strong joint. The flux was never wiped off after it was soldered and after time oxidation will form on the pipe. Look at the top of the pipe. It is not in contact with the hanger.


From the back of the can of Utility Flux "Wipe off excess after soldering. Fill system with water as soon as possible to rinse away any flux residue."

Get a piece of copper pipe, wipe flux on it and put it on the shelf. In time the flux will turn green with oxidation.


--
John Savino
HomeWorks Inspection Services, LLC
St. James, NY
631.379.4241

Originally Posted By: jbilski
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John,


I would agree with the solder theory except for one thing. This was an area of straight piping. There were no solder joints. It looks like the corrosion worked it’s way around the piping from the dissimilar metal contact of the hanger. Unless…the installer soldered the hangers to the pipe. Seems like a lot of extra work to solder all these hangers, but who knows.


Thanks for all your help guys.
I'll keep my eye on these hangers ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


Originally Posted By: jsavino
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John


The pipes and hangers were soldered together to prevent movement.


A lot of installers do it. Take it from experience, its flux that was never wiped off.



John Savino


HomeWorks Inspection Services, LLC


St. James, NY


631.379.4241