Dead Front removal question

So I went with the wife on a pre-listing appointment just to do a “look see” on the overall condition of a home. Nothing for the seller, but just added eyes for the wife if anything should maybe be done prior to listing. Anyway, 1998 Square D panel and I observed, but not removing anything, two inner “pins” that held the dead front along with the external mount screws. Strange, but first time I’ve come across this. I’ve done many with no inner screws or ones I call guide screws ( no head, slotted) but never one like this.

Question is: How do you remove these “pins” to get the dead front off? TIA!!

You don’t…

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I had one of those recently and everything came off with the 4 screws on the outer cover. The inner pins were like a hinge of sorts. The cover came off easy but putting it back on was a pain in the keester. Hope this helps.

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Don’t touch those pins! LOL. The “inner pinned” panel will be a little loose but comes off with the “main cover”. It seems to give the panel a little “play” so the big outer panel will line up. I also think it is adjustable to allow the inner panel to sit snuggly against the breakers closing any gaps. That is my take.

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There you go, Grasshopper. :laughing:

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So, by pulling the outer screws, the inner pins come out with the main cover? Then you place the outer screws and align and replace the pins?

From what I gather, the inner cover of the dead front, there are 2 pieces, is loose retaining the breakers on spring mounted pins. This was done so when electricians or technicians mount or dismount the panel front breakers squarely remain in there numbered slot position.
Just my 2 cents, for what it worth.

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Just remove the screws and cover as normal, You don’t have to worry about those pins…

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They were attached to the main cover. Solid front with pins in place.

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Brian has it. Those are loose rivets and a spring wrapped around them allows the “inner panel” to float relative to the outer one. It’s all one connected cover system.

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Thanks guys! Now I know what to expect when I come across one during an inspection. Guess I’m surprised that I haven’t yet. But then again, I have yet to come across a gas fueled tank water heater. 99.9% of the time they are electric.

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That’s cause you are in the God’s country. :grinning:

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Jim has it covered…you see the screws?

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As said above, each of the 2 pins has a spring wrapped around them to hold the inner panel up against the breakers. Not to be removed. Having said that, it does not look like that is working very well. Are there gaps between the inner panel cutouts and the breakers? Maybe it’s just how the photo looked to me. I’m not familiar with Schneider/SquareD or Homeline breakers that look like the ones in the photo.

See them all the time in condos here. Pins have nothing to do with removing the panel cover. Just remove the outer screws, and ignore the pins.

Thanks guys! All the info makes sense now. I’ve just never removed a two piece panel like that and wasn’t sure about the pins. I know now when I have to. @dmccubbin, the picture I posted was of a similar panel and not the actual panel I looked at. I wasn’t doing an inspection, just looking around and noticed the style of dead front I haven’t come across.

Thanks again!

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I think its funny how the houses are built across the country. I see those “Automatic flush adjusting covers” in more than half the homes here in central California. Also 99,9% of all water heaters here are gas powered. I couldn’t tell you a damned thing about a brick built home as we don’t have any, same with septic and wells. LMAO! Welcome to city life.

Great community! Love being a part of you guys!

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Amen Brother!! :+1:

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