Did I make the wrong choice?

So I’ve been excited about getting into the home inspection field up to this point, but after completing the defect recognition and report writing course and reading all this info about liability, attorneys, and lawyers i’m wondering if I made a good choice choosing this field. I’d hate to give it all up for the fear of being sued because i feel i’ll really enjoy it but now its got me wondering…anyone have any advice?

This may seem harsh, but I’m not gonna blow smoke up your ass. … “It’s not for everybody”.

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Only you can make the choice.

And yes, you could be sued at any time, that’s one of the reasons we carry insurance. Always remember, you’re inspecting what is most peoples largest investment, so you’d better know what you’re looking at.

But also always remember, we all had to start somewhere and none of us know it all, one of the beauty’s and strength of this MB is the vast knowledge base between us all. The only dumb question is the one you don’t ask.

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Curious, where did you read all of this at, concerning liability? In some of the InterNACHI courses?

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If you are just getting your education and credentials lined up, now may be a good time to accompany a good, experienced inspector on a job or two and see what is involved up close and have a conversation about these concerns of yours. After doing so, you may be able to make a decision about moving forward with more confidence and understanding of the risks and rewards of this career.
Each of us have our own level of risk aversion and also our situations may be very different.
If you are the sole provider for your family, your options are different than if you have a sugar momma and this is going to be a hobby occupation.

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The defect recognition and report writing course.

I’ve tried that but unfortunately with this covid around no one wants any more people than necessary in their home, and I don’t blame them.

We were sued for a defect we called out multiple times in the report. The insurance company agreed we were correct and decided we weren’t negligent but weighed out the cost to defend the case (larger sum) vs what the client was asking (smaller sum) and agreed to pay out rather than defend and it cost us our deductible. Sucks but it’s the nature of the game. Do a good job go above and beyond for your clients and take your time. Disclaimers all day long. At the end of the day any business you open you are at risk of being sued.

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Nobody welcomed Todd to the forum on his first day. Welcome, Todd have fun and enjoy :v:

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Thank You!

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Todd. You are tired, as can be expected, from all the work you did.
You made a wise decision to be a certified processional inspector. Remember that.

Now its time to traverse the next leg of your journey, become a CPI. Be prepared. It will take >< 2 years, hopefully sooner, to gain recognition to keep the phone ringing.

Don’t be like the herd unless you want to be seen like the herd. Stick out. Be different professionally. Work hard. Believe in yourself. I do!

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I thought that was Larry’s job. He must be ‘slackin’ again!! :wink:

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That is what I thought. I might be stepping on his toes :grinning:

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He’s a big boy. He’ll get over it. :wink:

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Don’t let the course scare you. Just use what you learned in the course to remind you to always pay close attention and be on your toes. If you learn everything you need to know about the components of a home and do a good job explaining any issues in the report you will be just fine.

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It’s something that has crossed my mind as well. If you multiply everything inspected in a home by every inspection you do, it comes out to be a large number of potential mistakes over the course of a career. Pays to be good and careful I suppose.

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Helpful hints for New Inspectors.pdf (230.1 KB)
Here’s some stuff you don’t learn in school…hang in there!

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Very helpful, thank you!

Without a construction background you are at a disadvantage certainly. If you haven’t hands on built something you don’t know how it goes together and works or supposed to work. That being said you can fill in that knowledge gap but that’s up to you. Don’t rely on internachi or this forum alone for information, they’re good but hardly the ultimate authority.Use multiple sources talk to some older trades people and contractors. Even the YouTube warriors are good for a laugh. Good luck keep learning.

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All in all this carrier or business is probably no more prone to lawsuits than most other businesses and probably lees than if you have some kind of brink and mortar store. I say this mainly based on the cost of E&O/GL premiums we pay versus what I have paid when I had a insulation contracting business. Cost of premiums is probably the best indicator when it comes to lawsuits or other liability of a business. The Insurance companies have run “These Numbers” based on risk.

At least we can have a more proactive say in if we are going to be sued because we can minimize it by not being sloppy, taking our time and getting educated…and that education is not just limited to our knowledge of building science or gaining experience in the various aspects of a house. We need to also educate our selves on how to write a report. Don’t guess on things, don’t step out of the SOPs unless you are comfortable in doing so. Also make sure you use disclaimers where you need to (if the electrical panel is blocked, put that in the report along with photos). As you gain experience you will pick up on little things that can limit your liability. One thing I do if home is vacant, I do the outside first and as I do, I check doors to see if they are unlocked. If they are, a take a picture of it (time stamps are your friend)…then I use my Supra access which will time stamp my entry. If something comes up missing or if they accuse you of steeling their prescription drugs (happened to me) You are no longer the prime suspect.

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