Electrical panel installed in bathroom

Is is a code violation to have a panel installed in a bathroom

Can an electric panel be located in a bathroom? (howtolookatahouse.com)

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Per NEC 2020:

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Welcome to our forum, Ron!..enjoy participating.

What kind of bathroom, dwelling unit or commercial space? For a dwelling unit the panel can be in the bathroom but it cannot have any circuit breakers or fuses in it. :slightly_smiling_face:

How old is the place?

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Do you have to stand in the tub to access the panel?

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One must walk on water first to test breakers, grasshopper. :wink:

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Anyone know when the bathroom prohibition was added to the NEC? I see bathroom panels fairly often, but I know nobody will care to change them. It’s easy to cite a theoretical risk, harder to imagine it being an actual risk.

According to @mcyr original post article.
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Thanks. Potential narrative:

An electrical panel is located in the hall bathroom: water and electrical equipment are a poor match. While bathroom locations are not allowed in new installations as of the 1993 National Electric Code, no requirement exists to change the location in existing construction.

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When I learned this business I was taught to NEVER cite codes. When you do, a person can hang you for the one you didn’t cite. Over the years the industry has definitely moved towards codes but I’m still against it.

In this case I’d probably just say the installation is a safety concern due to the close proximity to water. Besides, I’m sure the first electrician they talk to will tell them it’s AGAINST CODE, thus saving us the trouble anyway.

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The panel could be installed right next to a laundry sink if the workspace clearances are met and it would meet code. It can be next to a water heater also.

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I agree, it’s a common misconception that a panel cannot be immediately adjacent to a water source. It can be next to a sink, washing machine, hose bib, etc. Maintaining the working space is what matters as you’ve mentioned,

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I’m trying to get at the distinction between “not allowed in new construction” and “must be changed”. Those get mixed up all the time.

In older homes I believe this isn’t a code violation as there wasn’t code against this at the time. I cant imagine an insurance company being happy though, nor anyone buying a house because you are buying a problem.

As far as I know there is no “must be changed” other than recalls. So your advice is likely that.