Fire remediation question - quality control

Can anyone tell me if this is an acceptable result. Contractor claims the area was treated with a dry ice application and sealed. I thought sealant had a color to it, and shouldn’t a dry ice application remove all of the charring.

Using dry ice blasting removes the char and discoloration. That does not look like it was blasted with dry ice.

Would a sealant be colored, or is there clear sealants now? My general contractor who is doing the repair work said he thought it should be colored to show what was sealed.

Thank you for the quick reply.

I have seen plain shellac being used. If it was used, you should not be able to smell any smoke/odors when you get close to it. Usually a shellac based seal is used and normally white.

Thank you again. You are very helpful. The remediation company told my contractor they used something called Hydrocide, but I don’t think that is a sealer. My contractor was not familiar with it.

Whenever there is a fire of that magnitude, where the wall covering is removed to bare the framing, etc., a permit must be pulled around here.

We cannot tell from one picture on a forum the extent of the damage, etc. and this is not a DIY forum.

The AHJ will say when you can cover it back up.

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/internachi/original/3X/f/7/f758d2e4bde0b1fed8deb73f3b2f2ddc6e546d5a.jpeg

Best to you.

There are smoke seal products that are opaque or clear. They are applied with a UV fogger. It will seal the odor into the wood. Have applied it many times.

Generally, something like this is covered with a primer/sealer. Kilz Latex Premium will seal it as well as many other products. It wasn’t cleaned as they said it was. Using dry ice on that would be extremely expensive, which is probably what they figured out and why it didn’t happen.

Exactly, White pigmented shellac from Sherwain Williams.
You want something to seal and eliminate any smell from the charring and smoke.

Yes, Marcel, I have used that on small areas of charring/smoke smell.