Free Pools and Spas Inspection Checklist for California.

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #1

Free Pools and Spas Inspection Checklist for California

(Ian W. Mayer, CMI) #2

Kind of an odd list.

No one vacuums a pool daily. And even if they did, how the heck would an inspector know what goes on one a daily basis?

Again, how the heck is an inspector going to know how often the water is tested? We’re there for a few hours, not observing a pool over the course of several months.

Pointless for a home inspector. Chemical levels can change daily. Whatever any inspector finds will be irrelevant in 3 weeks when escrow closes.

What does that even mean?

Not every pool has a heater.

And if it’s winter, I’m not heating my pool!

Again, pointless, as the water temperature could be different in a few hours. And pointless if it’s not swimming season.

Not to mention all of the above contradicts the NACHI Pool SOP
InterNACHI’s Standards of Practice for Inspecting Pools & Spas - InterNACHI

BTU, sure, if it’s on the label.
Efficiency?
Again that goes against the SOP.

Though I suppose it’s a non-issue as no one made a residential pool heater with a standing pilot light in a long time, and if you found one, doubtful it would be working!

Really should say “IF A solar-heating system is installed.” as most pools don’t have one, and in the cases of the pools that do have one, 90% of the time, the solar panels are leaking.

Unless we’re taking apart light fixtures, I’m not sure how we identify wattages of lights. And with LED’s becoming more popular, wattage is no longer a primary way to rate lights anyway.

One might want to check their E&O policy on that one. Some/many(all?) policies require disclaiming diving boards.

While true, it’s a bit vague.

The enclosure has to be meeter particular requirements to be compliant.

I failed a fence yesterday because it met most, but not all of the requirements to be a valid enclosure, and under the Pool safety act, if an enclosure doesn’t meet ALL requirements, it’s not a valid enclosure.

(Gary D. Rowden) #3

I agree Ian it’s defiantly an odd check list :roll:

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #4

It is. Because if you want to inspect a pool, you have to do more than what is required by the home inspector new regulation. The new regulation is merely something ADDITIONAL and now REQUIRED by home inspectors.

Let me try this another way. Let’s say California passes a law tomorrow that says all home inspectors must check furnace filters. Fine. But that doesn’t mean to inspect a furnace in California, all you need to do now is check the filter.

Does that help at all?

(Ian W. Mayer, CMI) #5

I’m just saying, for anyone who is new to inspecting pools, that checklist creates more confusion than it helps.

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #6

Without taking the course, I wouldn’t use it myself.

There is a basis to each item that is designed to protect you.

(Scot Baker, CMI) #7

Number One on the list of CA requirements is vague and has left off a lot of language.

(Ian W. Mayer, CMI) #8

Well, as I said in the other thread, As of June 25th, the California Association of Realtors SBSA (Statewide Buyer and Seller Advisory) form will specifically state the home inspectors duty to report on the pool safety barrier.

So best to get it right.

(Sky L. Pelham) #9

I always keep up with your threads Ian, always a good read and ACCURATE. Heck, I think if there was a useful checklist it’d come from you.

(Albert Villegas, Sr.) #10

Thanks Nick, I’ve updated my template based on this.

(Ian W. Mayer, CMI) #11

Case in point:

This is an enclosure that isolates the swimming pool or spa from the private single-family home.

However, it does NOT meet the requirements of the California Pool Safety Act.

There is a difference. :wink: