FRT Plywood

Originally Posted By: rwills
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Just wondering if anyone could share their thoughts or procedures on how they inspect and report on fire treated plywood commonly found in multi dwelling units! Thanks, BW.


Originally Posted By: rwills
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C’mon, Someone at least say sorry Bob, don’t know nuthin’ bout it! so I at least know someone is seeing the messages. I’m starting to believe these messages are only appearing on my computer! icon_question.gif


Originally Posted By: wcampbell
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Sorry, Bob, Don’t know nothing about it. icon_redface.gif



This Ole House-Home Inspections


William A. Campbell TREC # 6372


Serving the Texas Coastal Bend


(361) 727-0602 (home)


(361) 727-0055 (office)


(361) 229-4103 (cell)

Originally Posted By: rwills
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William, That’s what I’m talking bout’! Feel the love! Thanks, BW icon_biggrin.gif


Originally Posted By: wcampbell
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Bob, Just wanted you to know, your 'puters working. icon_wink.gif



This Ole House-Home Inspections


William A. Campbell TREC # 6372


Serving the Texas Coastal Bend


(361) 727-0602 (home)


(361) 727-0055 (office)


(361) 229-4103 (cell)

Originally Posted By: jhorton
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Sorry, Bob, Don’t know nothing about it. icon_redface.gif



Jeff <*\><


The man who tells the truth doesn’t have to remember what he said.

Originally Posted By: rwills
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Thanks William, Nothin’ like peace of mind! icon_wink.gif


I am posting a couple of sites I found regarding FRT plywood-Since this was widely used in the 70's and 80's in multiple family dwellings and is now a big issue because of thermal degredation of the plywood due to the chemicals and drying methods used in manufacturing, it has great potential for lawsuits if not recognized and reported on at least in this area. I would definitely research your area as far as it's use. Thanks, BW

http://alcor.concordia.ca/~raojw/crd/reference/reference001759.html

http://www.architectural-support-group.com/frt.htm


Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi Bob, like yourself I knew I knew something about FRT sheathing but could not remember what, other than there are problems associated with it due to it’s breaing down overtime especially when used as roof sheathing. I do not belive there is any class action suite over this type of product, due to it being primarily a problem of poor storage and installation. (guess the ambulance chasers are still busy over LP siding) icon_lol.gif


So as we're playing links this is the best one I found for an overview.

http://www.npjp.com/library/docs/NPCOL1_624753_1.pdf

Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: rwills
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Thanks Gerry, Great site for info on FRT Plywood. I’m in the middle of a situation regerding this now and want to make the right call. Thanks, BW


Originally Posted By: Rusty Rothrock
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Bob-


I see FRT plywood a lot here in Richmond on attached townhouses and condos. You can easily spot the FRT plywood in the attic because it's a darker color than normal plywood. When exposed to attic heat for many years, the FRT plywood does start to break down (the glue deteriorates from what I've been told). You can sometimes see the sheathing actually coming apart. One needs to be extremely careful walking a roof that has FRT plywood. FRT plywood was used strictly at the sides of a roof where the roof butts a dividing wall or another roof of the townhouse/condo next door.

I always write it up that FRT is present on the roof sheathing. In cases where it looks real bad I will advise that 2 X 4 cross bracing should be installed between the trusses to add rigidity to the FRT plywood until such time that the shingles are replaced and the deteriorated FRT plywood can be replaced.

In the majority of these cases, there's an association who's responsible for the exterior, roof included. Normally these associations will only replace the FRT plywood when the shingles are due to be replaced.

Hope this helps you some.

Best Regards,
Rusty Rothrock
Richmond, VA


Originally Posted By: rwills
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Thanks Rusty,


I find quite a bit also here in the N/E except a lot of the associations aren’t responsible for the roof, the homeowner is. Case in point, a recent inspection involved a client who is buying a larger townhouse in the same development he resides in. He had to replace his entire roof, sheathing and all dur to the FRT issue. Poor ventilation also plays a big part in the breakdown of this material. Thanks, again, BW