Home Inspector vs Licensed Electrical Contractor

In Ohio, starting November 1st, only a Licensed Home Inspector or an Electrical Safety Inspector can inspect any part of an electrical system in a 1, 2, 3 family structure.

No person in the State of Ohio holds a residential electrical license so they are not exempt from the new Ohio Home Inspector Law.

If you are a Licensed Home Inspector in Ohio after November 1st and if any electrician follows you and says that you are wrong you can report them for violating RC 4764 and possibly RC 3783.

Now a seasoned Home Inspector can stop challenges from an electrician with 2 or 3 months in the field experience.

Know the rules - rules are power!

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Who does this benefit? Doesn’t the Hi usually recommend that the defects be addressed by a licensed electrician?

What most people do NOT know is that every electrical repair or new work, if there is an AHJ, MUST be inspected by an electrical inspector.

Only 540 individuals in Ohio can inspect electrical work to verify that it is installed properly. Electricians are not included nor are home inspectors, PE’s or anyone else.

Much of the small work is performed by unlicensed individuals.

All I am saying is that if you are a Home Inspector in Ohio you should know the rules. Some are 50 years old, some are new.

How can a Licensed Home Inspector inspect the electrical system if, as you have been preaching for the last month, removing the panel cover is Illegal?

It’s called the readily accessible components.

RA

You left out the definition for “Readily accessible” in RC 4764.01. Tell everyone what RC 4764.01 is and what the definition for “Readily accessible” says there. I didn’t notice any reference to the NEC definition in RC 4764.01.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/4764.01

I’m no attorney, but I don’t think you’re supposed to take a definition from one document and substitute it for the definition that’s actually included in the law that you’re referencing, especially when they are quite different from one another.

I think you’re either confused or trying to confuse others. Are you licensed as an attorney, a legislator or regulator in Ohio or you do have some other qualification to be interpreting the law and providing legal advice to the public and informing home inspectors what they can and cannot do under the law?

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Chuck

The law is like the building code. Example: A friend called me and wanted my opinion the NEC (which is codified in Ohio). His guys drilled multiple holes in floor joists across the entire basement. The framing inspection failed because of his electrical work.

The holes met the requirements of 300.4(A)(1) of the NEC however he violated 502.8 of the RCO. You must apply all rules (the law). The State of Ohio considers me an expert on both of these documents.

Have you attended the mandated training on these documents? I have.

You are the one giving legal opinions of the laws of another state. Maybe, I should forward your comments to the Supreme Court of Ohio? In Ohio the practice of law is whatever they say it is.

I operate in Ohio and know what laws apply to my profession(s). Go kick a tumbleweed or a cactus if you need to prove your manhood.

Removing the cover panel is illegal??? LOL
Someone is very confused. If you consider a panel a major obstacle you are a hack crud inspector.:face_vomiting: God help any of your clients. Everyone else, except for you, knows inspecting the inside of an electrical panel is an important part of a home inspection. Maybe that is your justification for taking the easy way out. One wonders what other unethical shortcuts you take.:money_mouth_face::money_mouth_face::money_mouth_face:

Your original post is confused as well, even if it becomes a misguided law: What if the electrician following you, the home inspector, calls out something and he is correct? You are saying you are immune by law from any liability for incorrect assessments and that someone whistle blowing your sss is going to be penalized?:bikini:

Since your response to Chuck ignored his reference, here it is:
(G) “Readily accessible” means available for visual inspection without requiring a person to move or dismantle personal property, take destructive measures, or take any other action that will involve risk to a person or to the property.

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Removing the cover is not illegal - inspecting the inside is!

I’m allowed to inspect the inside - a home inspector is not.

I really don’t care if you understand Ohio law.

Ohio’s SOP was changed, at my request, to limit the electrical section to reflect the statute.

So you think that removing a dead front involves no risk to a person? Schneider Electric disagrees with you. As does OSHA, NFPA and countless other experts in the electrical field.

I can verify proper wire size, grounding, bonding, and much more - a home inspector can not.

Ohio has had a higher standard for almost 50 years. Want the law changed? Then lobby for it.

That is Total BS. Any competent home Inspector can definitely (and accurately) inspect all of the above and much more.

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Worth saving these “statements of fact”. Got more? :+1:

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Arrogant and Ignorant!

The new WAFI
:rofl:

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Removing the cover is not illegal - inspecting the inside is!

I’m allowed to inspect the inside - a home inspector is not.

I really don’t care if you understand Ohio law.

Ohio’s SOP was changed, at my request, to limit the electrical section to reflect the statute.

So you think that removing a dead front involves no risk to a person? Schneider Electric disagrees with you. As does OSHA, NFPA and countless other experts in the electrical field.

I can verify proper wire size, grounding, bonding, and much more - a home inspector can not.

Ohio has had a higher standard for almost 50 years. Want the law changed? Then lobby for it.

The home inspection is a “visual” inspection. Therefore, once the cover is removed, visually, any competent inspector can do all of the above.

As has been pointed out, the building code is a minimum. The SoP is a minimum.
If you end up in a court of law, none of that matters.
What does matter is “Standard of Care”.

What do others in your profession do.
Which leads us into risk, personal and property damage risk.
Many moons ago, an inspector on here said he would’t inspect an air handler that was located in a closet because, “an antique stroller” was in the way of the door. That was his justification for not inspecting something.

If one so desired, you could justify not inspecting everything as it is too dangerous and may cause personal injury or property damage of some sort.

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Amazing how many are experts on Ohio law.

Btw. Out the door to enforce the code.

Have a nice day.

This isn’t the “Ohio” Section, it’s the Electrical Section of a world wide organization. What you’re saying in the thread you started here has Zero validity. Keep All of your unproven opinions in the Ohio Section of this MB.

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Hey I do not known how to enter an original question, so I piggy back onto this one.

Question: Is the garage opener required to be on a GFCI as accessible outlets. I was following this information, GFCI protection is not required for receptacles that are not readily accessible, such as a ceiling-mounted receptacle for a garage door opener but on all accessible outlets.

**Is this outdated and all outlets in a garage required to be on a GFCI, including the garage opener located above the opener

Simmie Butler
Butler Home Inspection LLC

Yes GFCI protection is required for all 120 volt receptacles in a garage, (unless you’re in New Jersey). The GFCI protective device is also required to be readily accessible meaning that it cannot be a receptacle mounted on the ceiling unless it can be tested from the floor without tools or ladders.

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Ohio has a rule on that but no one likes to hear about Ohio rules.

So when mounted above opener and not reachable other then a ladder, it should not be on a GFCI outlet, is that still the case?

Simmie Butler

When Ohio required the GDO to be GFCI protected the GFCI device had to be readily accessible. Like on the wall and the receptacle on the ceiling. Understand?