Log Home

Originally Posted By: jpope
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This is not at all common here in So. Cal. and a first for me.


Can anyone tell me, is this pretty standard "Log Cabin" type construction? Notice the T&G in the second picture.

![](upload://wgX3d1fpriBKzisIw1JQoNxcoaB.jpeg)

![](upload://9YrE4AjcVGdQWdeRJgRAspjLI38.jpeg)




--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: rshumake
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Appears to be “standard” from the pictures. T&G logs help lock them together as well as insulate. Should be some form of insulation between the logs such as 1/2 inch x4 fiberglass. The most important part of log home construction is logs settle, sometimes as most as 3 inches. ALL windows, doors and interior walls should allow for this either by deadwood and slots or sliding bolts. Hope this helps


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Very helpful, thanks. I had no idea about the “shrinkage factor.” Does that have something to do with the cold weather (just kidding).


How can I see the insulation at this point?


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: rshumake
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Even the so-called dried logs have shrinkage. Try looking at all joints in the corners as well as inside windows and doors if the trim is not in place.


Originally Posted By: rshumake
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After thinking for a minute I guess I should say compression factor. Meaning the logs ie. the wall will “shrink” in height.


Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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Insulation between the logs? I’ve never seen it. The tongue and groove wouldn’t work very well with the insulation between them.


Here's a resource for you to get further information.

Log Builders' Association Building Standards


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: Guest
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Normally a butyl strip or urethane caulk is used between the logs. There does appear to be a foam filler strip in place. Many of the producst used are proprietary and the foam strip may be part of the kit supplied by the log manufacturer. Window and door frames shoul have at least an inch and a half of clearance above each jamb to allow for log compression and the framing should be mounted using slots.


Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi Jeff,


I am no expert on log homes (I learned everything I know about them from "Hometime" & Bob Villa ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) ) but if I were you I would be looking for the 1 year warranty insperction as you are unlikely to see much evidence of compression settlement or shrinkage at this time as the home is a new build. Normally these home are built with systems in place to accomodate for movement in the structure. For example slip joints between different parts of the structure, adjustable screw jacks to allow for differential shrinkage, flexible joints between the structure and the mechanical systems etc.

I hope this confuses you even further

Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: Peter Foxe Smothers
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Good link Erby!


I am sure I will never see a log home here in Shreveport, Louisiana but it was good reading.
Foxe Smothers


Originally Posted By: tschwalbe
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Please Gerry dont get me started on Bob the poser Vila


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Great link Erby…I have my first log home inspection next week sometime and need to know what to look for. Lived in a log home most of my childhood, but never paid much attention to it.


I’ve printed out the document and plan on reading it over the weekend.


Buyer has called me 4 times about this home…he is a very knowledgeable homebuyer…he checks everything out!



Wisconsin Home Inspection, ABC Home Inspection LLC


Search the directory for a Wisconsin Home Inspector

Originally Posted By: rmoewe
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I have inspected a few of these log homes. None of them had the T&G logs. They were built before log kits came out. There was a lot of compression in these homes. The ridge line on one of them, was out of level by at least 2 foot. That is how much the logs will compress. This one in particular was built in 1910.


The older homes use chinking (sp) in-between the logs. This acts as 2 things waterproofing and insulation. I also add in my reports that a Borate treatment should be maintained on the home. This will keep the termite, Carpenter Bees, and Powder Post Beatles from eating the logs. icon_wink.gif


Originally Posted By: rmoewe
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Here is another website about log homes. Compliments of Larry O.


http://www.americanlogrestoration.com/
You can go here and ask questions about log homes. ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)


Originally Posted By: dsmith1
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I have never inspected a log home but a neihbour up the street had one built. As mentioned before allowance for shrinkage is important. If you notice in the interior photo above the interior stud walls finish below the roof trusses. They are hed in place at the ceiling with bolts that will slide as the exterior walls settle.


Originally Posted By: kbernard
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I came across this topic a little late. But I still wanted to reply in case I may be of some help in the future. I live in Kalispell Montana and have spent over 10 years building log Homes. These homes are all hand crafted. I have not seen to many of the T&G type of log construction but I can help with any of the other questions anyone might have in regards to Log construction. They are very interesting and some of the projects were 10,000 feet. Some of the Logs we have used are 3 feet in diameter.


Thanks for listening


Kelly


Originally Posted By: loconnor
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I’m also a little late in this tread but let me give my two cents worth.


First of all, I want to say that the log home has the appearance of a handcrafted home. But everything else points to a milled home.

I can't see the log ends too clear, but if the tongue and groove is as tight as they look, foam or butyl rubber strips would be appropriate for this construction.

As a rule, milled log homes do not require the special longer slots and dowels that would be needed in handcrafted homes because the moisture content is less, and the logs are usually less heavy. Therefore during shrinkage of the logs and the eventual settling of the structure, the milled log homes only require about 1-2 inches above the doors and windows.

A true hancrafted log home does require 3-6 inces of spacing, and the logs them selves can come as swedish cope (the top of the lower log is chisled out to allow the upper log to sit on it).. This is where actual insulation is used. It is compressed over the years (approx 6-8 ) and allows almost no air infiltration if crafted and assembled correctly. How the corners are cut to fit determines if there will be spacing between the logs or not. With spacing a special chinking material is applied which allows for the expansion and contraction of the walls over the years and still maintain a moisture and air barrier. This is one of the things that have to be checked because, depending on the manufacturer, you will get some stress and eventual cracking of this material.

The roof of log homes or I guess any home with cathedral ceilings, requires a built up roof, which most of you are probably familiar with.

Wow! Sorry this was so long, I really love log homes. Never owned one though.

![nachi_sarcasm.gif](upload://6HQh6KbNiD73gqTNQInjrR2zeJw.gif)


--
Larry
Western Michigan NACHI Chapter
http://www.w-michigan-nachi.org

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without boasting of it.
We respect that of others
without fearing it"
Thomas Jefferson