No Excuse For Ground-Level Roof Inspections --Barry Stone

Originally Posted By: tallen
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http://www.housedetective.com/columns/story.shtml?storyid=523



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: Jay Moge
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your link is not working.


Originally Posted By: lkage
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Check back later. icon_wink.gif



“I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn’t learn something from him.”


Galileo Galilei

Originally Posted By: tallen
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Barrys site seems to be down.


http://www.housedetective.com/


--
I have put the past behind me,
where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.

www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif


I see a test page.


Marcel


Originally Posted By: rwand
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Maybe Barry fell off a roof…


As to the by line No Excuse For Ground-Level Roof Inspections --Barry Stone


I disagree totally. Why would anyone put their life in jeoprady? Who is going to pay for an inspectors down time because of a fall? Who is going to cover for a dead inspector because he fell off a roof and feed his dependents? Does Barry also believe inspectors should walk steep pitched roofs? I don't think so , so why would he suggest walking roofs that are at least two storys?

If anyone is walking roofs that are not easily accessible from an 10 foot ladder are they following proper safety protocols by being tethered and wearing a full fall harness?

Sorry I think Barry is out in left field on this one! I use to go onto roofs most always. Not any longer. If I can't get onto a low slope roof with my fold up ladder, inspections are down from the ground with the assistance of binoculars. It is just not worth the risk.

What are the alternatives? Inspectors should be sure to have purchasers consult with vendor as to exact age. Use of binoculars. Checking attics for underside roof issues, disclosing that the roof was not walked, et ceteras.

But on the other hand I am interested in reading the article at the above link.

Raymond Wand
Alton, ON


--
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905

http://www.raymondwand.ca
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (R.H.I.)

Originally Posted By: rcooke
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tallen wrote:
Barrys site seems to be down.

http://www.housedetective.com/

I got this . Roy C sr




If you are a member of the general public:
The fact that you are seeing this page indicates that the website you just visited is either experiencing problems, or is undergoing routine maintenance.

If you would like to let the administrators of this website know that you've seen this page instead of the page you expected, you should send them e-mail. In general, mail sent to the name "webmaster" and directed to the website's domain should reach the appropriate person.

For example, if you experienced problems while visiting www


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: away
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Raymond,


I am not sure if you got to read the article before the site went down. If not, he didn't say that ALL roofs should be walked, he just said that if it is safe and no damage (house or inspector) will result, that a roof should be walked.

He also said that eave level inspection, with moving a ladder to many points around the perimeter, was better than standing on the ground.

Now for that two story, 30' tall roof? I don't care how low the slope is, my rearend is staying safe on the ground with binoculars and a big disclaimer in my report to boot.


--
Andrew Way
Keystone Residential Inspection Services PLLC
817.441.9598
www.keystoneinspections.com

Originally Posted By: rwand
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Andrew no I didn’t get a chance to read the article. Fwiw, moving the ladder to every side of the house is time consuming, and ladder should be tied off to boot. Who has time do that and ensure ladder is level etc. I’ll take the risk by reporting on condition of roof from the ground, except roofs I am comfortable walking on that are easily accessible. I have had reports of inspectors carry second ladders onto first roof to gain access to second roof and so on. No way Jose.


I am with you. I stay on the ground. ![icon_cool.gif](upload://oPnLkqdJc33Dyf2uA3TQwRkfhwd.gif)

Cheers,
Raymond Wand
Alton, ON


--
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905

http://www.raymondwand.ca
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (R.H.I.)

Originally Posted By: rcooke
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



away wrote:
Raymond,

I am not sure if you got to read the article before the site went down. If not, he didn't say that ALL roofs should be walked, he just said that if it is safe and no damage (house or inspector) will result, that a roof should be walked.

He also said that eave level inspection, with moving a ladder to many points around the perimeter, was better than standing on the ground.

Now for that two story, 30' tall roof? I don't care how low the slope is, my rearend is staying safe on the ground with binoculars and a big disclaimer in my report to boot.

Good one Andrew .
I did a roof like that a few weeks ago.
I have a 25 power spotting scope on a tripod.
I could see three sides but not the north .
It was Built on the side of a hill and lots of trees hid the North Three side almost new .
I went over 400 feet up the hill to see the north side .
WOW! It had not been done three years ago because it was still good .
My a$% would have been in a sling if I had missed that .
If I could not have seen the roof I again would have written that in my
report and said recommend that they further evaluation by a qualified person.
. No way would I go up thirty feet on uneven ground to boot.
Roy Cooke sr


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: mcyr
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif


Up to 6/12 pitch one story, no problem.

Two stories and 6/12 pitch, I agree, it is safer using binoculars and just as affective.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: rwand
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



War story…


When I was in the film business I was given the task of laying heavy lighting cable on a cedar shake roof of a restaurant (The Keg). It was night time and the roof was damp. Guess what I started to slide off. I got stopped just before the edge. Diapers would have been great.

As I get older I am more cautious of heights. That is why I could never be a rock climber or repell off high places. There is also the arguement that walking on a hot asphalt shingles or metal or wood, can cause damage. Who will pay for resulting damage. Last man on roof, last man in theory me thinks!

Cheers
Raymond Wand
Alton, ON


--
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905

http://www.raymondwand.ca
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (R.H.I.)

Originally Posted By: mcyr
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif


Did you mean Pampers for adult size or overgrown toddler size. ha. ha.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: rwand
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Actually I had a premanent colostomy installed for those tight situations! Who needs Depends? Only kidding. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


Raymond Wand
Alton, ON


--
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905

http://www.raymondwand.ca
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (R.H.I.)

Originally Posted By: jtroth
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I always try to walk the roof, carefully of course. There have been times that I have not due to safety. Wet steep roof and because is was too darn high three stories. Caution and safety is a goal. If I cannot walk the roof I view it the best I can with binoculars and from underneath in the attic.



Habitation Investigation LLC


Providing Home Inspections in Ohio


http://www.homeinspectionsinohio.com

Originally Posted By: dedwards
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I use a tried and true method and it has worked every time but once. If my “pucker factor” kicks in I do not go on the roof. The one time I ignored it, it almost got me killed. Went on a roof the had a relatively low pitch. Going up was fine, and I had to skirt around an arbor type feature to get to the main roof of the home. Everything was as they say “hunky dorey” until I tried to get back to the ladder. The ladder fully extended and had only a short portion showing above the roof edge. It was cool fall weather and the roof where I was trying to get back down from was in deep shade. It was just slippery enough for me to loose good footing. It was a hellava drop to the concrete and I could just see my skinny butt skating right past the ladder and going over the side. I ended up sitting down and scooting my butt across the roof to the ladder. Got down and made a mental note to just throw them drawers away after the inspection. The way I figure it…if it is acceptable to do any inspection from the ground or the roof edge with binoculars than it is acceptable to do it whenever I deem it unsafe. BTW, I have a pair of Vivitar binocs with a built in digital camera. Works like a charm and impresses the hell out of the client.


Originally Posted By: dedwards
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The vast majority of the time I find the hidden defects inside the attic anyway. Roof looks fine until I get in the attic and find the last roofer went ahead and put good shingles over rotted out wood or a hole using a piece of sheet metal and roofing bull to hold the shingle in place.


Originally Posted By: jonofrey
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I agree that every roof should be viewed from above.


http://www.futurehorizons.net/jetpacks.htm


--
Inspection Nirvana!

We're NACHI. Get over it.

Originally Posted By: mcyr
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



icon_smile.gif


Hey John; This thing is being redesigned, I don't know if I would trust it, I think I will stick to my binoculars.

Thanks anyway.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: bkelly2
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jonofrey wrote:
I agree that every roof should be viewed from above.

http://www.futurehorizons.net/jetpacks.htm


John what about this technique? ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif) NOT FOR EVERYONE SPECIALLY ME

http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/viewtopic.php?t=15626


--
"I used to be disgusted, Now I try to Be amused"-Elvis Costello