Orangeburg type sewer line material

Does this appear to be Orangeburg type sewer line material? built 1966 Loveland Colorado

Brian, it is kind of hard to tell from the inside, for me.


http://www.sewerhistory.org/articles/compon/orangeburg/orangeburg.htm

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Well we know one thing it is not, PVC or Cast Iron.

The pipe often softens and deforms with age, allowing infiltration and root intrusion. Two varieties exist: one with solid (homogeneous) walls and one with laminated walls. This pipe material was widely used in house laterals for over 70 years – until pvc took over.

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Process of elimination:
We are fairly certain that it is NOT PVC, it is NOT VITRIFIED CLAY and it is NOT TRANSITE!
I was installing Orangeburg in the late 1960’s for a short time.

If I had to make a guess, due to the layering on the left side of the picture and the dent on the right side I would suggest that it is Orangeburg.

In my opinion the product was junk and I believe it was made in Orangeburg Ohio.

Just my opinion: Bryce

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I agree it was junk, but never heard of Orangeburg, Ohio.
The pipe was first made in Orangeburg, New York. They all started as manufacturing of fiber conduits and then some made the sewer pipe.
Listed in the archives Wiki;
American ( East Chicago, Ill)

J – M Fibre Conduit ( Lockport, NY)

Bermico (by the Brown Co. of Berlin, NH)

American ( Fulton, NY)

Fibre Conduit Co. ( Orangeburg, NY)

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Thanks for the info Marcel. Happy New Year

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This is the narrative I went with.“We ran a camera from the 4” PVC cleanout below
the stairs 58’ to the city main. The line was
functional and draining properly, there was some
debris that we pushed through with the camera.
The material appeared to be Orangeburg, a fiber
conduit pipe, was manufactured from wood fibers
bound with a special water-resistant adhesive,
then impregnated with liquefied coal tar pitch.
Most Orangeburg has a lifespan of no more than
50 years, which would make the line near the end
of its serviceable lifespan. It looks a lot like cast
iron pipe which will rust and flake, but this material
appeared to have fibers. We recommend the
further review advice and services of a licensed
plumber as a second opinion and to help verify the
material and what actions to take."

Thanks Guys! I added the narrative I went with and added a couple more photos.