Overhead Garage Electric

Originally Posted By: syared
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What’s the rule on overhead electrical service wires running from the house to a garage?


Originally Posted By: jpope
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House to detached garage would be ten feet off the ground and twelve feet if it’s over the drive. Is this what you are asking about?



Jeff Pope


JPI Home Inspection Service


“At JPI, we’ll help you look better”


(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: tallen
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What does it cross over? Walkway, driveway?



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: tallen
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Damn you Pope icon_lol.gif



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: jpope
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Gotcha by 30 seconds icon_cool.gif



Jeff Pope


JPI Home Inspection Service


“At JPI, we’ll help you look better”


(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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It’s legal … if they followed all the rules. Which part is troubling to you? It should look essentially like a service drop. If it’s just some Romex strung through the trees it is a problem icon_wink.gif


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Your Outside Branch Circuit or Feeder would fall under the distances mentioned here by the twin posters:



Overhead spans of open conductors and open multi conductor cables of not over 600 volts, nominal, shall conform to the following:

(1) 3.0 m (10 ft) ? above finished grade, sidewalks, or from any platform or projection from which they might be reached where the voltage does not exceed 150 volts to ground and accessible to pedestrians only

(2) 3.7 m (12 ft) ? over residential property and driveways, and those commercial areas not subject to truck traffic where the voltage does not exceed 300 volts to ground

(3) 4.5 m (15 ft) ? for those areas listed in the 3.7-m (12-ft) classification where the voltage exceeds 300 volts to ground

(4) 5.5 m (18 ft) ? over public streets, alleys, roads, parking areas subject to truck traffic, driveways on other than residential property, and other land traversed by vehicles, such as cultivated, grazing, forest, and orchard


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: jpope
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Uhhh. . . yea, what Joe said icon_biggrin.gif



Jeff Pope


JPI Home Inspection Service


“At JPI, we’ll help you look better”


(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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jtedesco wrote:
...(4) 5.5 m (18 ft) ? over grazing

Must be for all those giraffe farms I here about ![nachi_sarcasm.gif](upload://6HQh6KbNiD73gqTNQInjrR2zeJw.gif)


--
.


Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
Place your Award Nominations
here !

Originally Posted By: syared
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Thanks! So the only approved wiring is the typical service drop type?


Originally Posted By: rmoewe
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I see a lot of those two wire type with the lights hanging off of them around here. They are never more than a #12 and run a 60 amp Panel. Do you think that they are rated for outdoor use???


They serve 3 purposes
1. To supply power to the garage
2. Light the yard, so they don't trip on engine parts
3. Use it for a clothes line. (Turning on the lights makes them dry faster)
![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif)


Originally Posted By: rmoewe
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phinsperger wrote:

jtedesco wrote:
...(4) 5.5 m (18 ft) ? over grazing

Must be for all those giraffe farms I here about ![nachi_sarcasm.gif](upload://6HQh6KbNiD73gqTNQInjrR2zeJw.gif)


That is so the crop dusters don't clip them. If they were at 10' their tail section may hit.


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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This is why I said it will look like a service drop


225.15 Supports over Buildings.
Supports over a building shall be in accordance with 230.29.
225.16 Point of Attachment to Buildings.
The point of attachment to a building shall be in accordance with 230.26.
225.17 Means of Attachment to Buildings.
The means of attachment to a building shall be in accordance with 230.27.


The conductors should be identified for the purpose and meet these requirements

225.4 Conductor Covering.
Where within 3.0 m (10 ft) of any building or structure other than supporting poles or towers, open individual (aerial) overhead conductors shall be insulated or covered. Conductors in cables or raceways, except Type MI cable, shall be of the rubber-covered type or thermoplastic type and, in wet locations, shall comply with 310.8. Conductors for festoon lighting shall be of the rubber-covered or thermoplastic type.
Exception: Equipment grounding conductors and grounded circuit conductors shall be permitted to be bare or covered as specifically permitted elsewhere in this Code.
The exception to 225.4 and Exception No. 2 to 250.184(A) clarify that bare neutral messenger wire cable assemblies may be regrounded at additional buildings.
225.5 Size of Conductors 600 Volts, Nominal, or Less.
The ampacity of outdoor branch-circuit and feeder conductors shall be in accordance with 310.15 based on loads as determined under 220.3 and Part II of Article 220.
225.6 Conductor Size and Support.
(A) Overhead Spans. Open individual conductors shall not be smaller than the following:
(1) For 600 volts, nominal, or less, 10 AWG copper or 8 AWG aluminum for spans up to 15 m (50 ft) in length and 8 AWG copper or 6 AWG aluminum for a longer span, unless supported by a messenger wire
(2) For over 600 volts, nominal, 6 AWG copper or 4 AWG aluminum where open individual conductors and 8 AWG copper or 6 AWG aluminum where in cable
The size limitation of copper and aluminum conductors for overhead spans is based on the need for adequate mechanical strength to support the weight of the conductors and withstand wind, ice, and other similar conditions. Exhibit 225.1 illustrates overhead spans that are not messenger supported, that are run between buildings, structures, or poles, and that are 600 volts or less. If the conductors are supported on a messenger, the messenger cable provides the necessary mechanical strength. See 396.10 for wiring methods permitted to be messenger supported.


Originally Posted By: John M Borchers
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Yes but aren’t all of these things assuming the electric is coming from a utility service pole and not a home?


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Quote:
Yes but aren't all of these things assuming the electric is coming from a utility service pole and not a home?


NO, the references given are related to:

Outside Branch Circuits and Feeders

They show requirements for outside branch circuits and feeders run on or between buildings, structures, or poles on the premises; and electric equipment and wiring for the supply of utilization equipment that is located on or attached to the outside of buildings, structures, or poles.


The rules are similar but are for outside branch circuits and feeders only.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm