pellett stove

Originally Posted By: gmulrain
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



An individual asked me what would happen if he tied a pellet stove into his forced air plenum in his basement to supplement his heating bill? I told him I would do a little research on it for him. My question is, Will this raise his moisture level in the basement? The stove has a forced vent on it. Any help or thoughts would be greatly appreciated


Originally Posted By: jbushart
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I would advise him to consult the manufacturer. Rigging a CO producing device to an air distribution system it was not designed for could have unexpected/tragic results.



Home Inspection Services of Missouri


www.missourihomeinspection.com


"We're NACHI. Get over it."

www.monachi.org

Originally Posted By: mlong
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



gmulrain wrote:
An individual asked me what would happen if he tied a pellet stove into his forced air plenum in his basement to supplement his heating bill? I told him I would do a little research on it for him. My question is, Will this raise his moisture level in the basement? The stove has a forced vent on it. Any help or thoughts would be greatly appreciated


I used to sell and install a variety of brands of pellet stoves in my former life. I know of many people that created something like hoods over their pellet stoves in order to channel heat into the air plenum, so that it would be distributed more evenly throughout the house. Many people with wood stoves have done the same. You're just channeling the convention air that is coming off of the stove anyway, into the distrubution system. Needless to say, one doesn't want to put the exhaust vent into the plenum. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

There are, in fact, pellet furnaces that are designed to have duct work attached to them.

As for your moisture question, I don't see how this would raise his moisture level. The pellet stove does not put any moisture into the air. It is like most other hot, forced air systems, it tends to dry out the air.


--
Mark Long
Peace of Mind Home Inspections
http://www.pomhi.net

Originally Posted By: jbushart
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



http://hearth.com/questions/qa907.html



Home Inspection Services of Missouri


www.missourihomeinspection.com


"We're NACHI. Get over it."

www.monachi.org

Originally Posted By: rcooke
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



CYA .


Remember every one wants to blame some one else for their mistake.


I would reply yes I think I have heard of it being done but I do not know much about it .


Give advice and it goes wrong guess who has to defend him self .


My opinion .


Advise him to the manufactures web site or look on the net.



Roy Cooke Sr.


http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: gmulrain
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Thanks for the info everyone. I’ll tell him to give it his best shot and have my carbon monoxide tester handy


Originally Posted By: mlong
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



the stove itself, in any way. And as always, use any product according to the manufacturer’s protocol. But if all one is doing is capturing the heat that is coming off of the stove anyway, there should be no safety issue.



Mark Long


Peace of Mind Home Inspections


http://www.pomhi.net

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



mlong wrote:
...But if all one is doing is capturing the heat that is coming off of the stove anyway, there should be no safety issue.
![icon_eek.gif](upload://yuxgmvDDEGIQPAyP9sRnK0D0CCY.gif)




A dangerous practice is to use space heaters as add-ons to forced-air furnaces. In these installations, a space heater is installed in the basement near the furnace. A sheet metal hood is fitted over the space heater and connected to a main return air duct. In theory, the heat from the space heater is drawn up into the return air stream and distributed through the supply ducts.

Cutting an opening into a return air duct can create sufficient negative pressure in the furnace room to overcome chimney draft and cause smoke to spillfrom the stove. Again, the risk is greatest during a receding fire as the draft level diminishes. Because the carbon monoxide that can be emitted is circulated directly through the ductwork, it could asphyxiate the building occupants while they sleep. The negative pressure may also cause the furnace to emit carbon monoxide.

The practice is strictly prohibited by the Canadian National Building Code, which states: "The return air system shall be designed so that the negative pressure from the circulating fan cannot affect the furnace combustion air supply nor draw combustion products from joints or openings in the furnace or flue pipe."

The Canadian code also states: "A heating system using solid fuels shall not be connected to a heating system incorporating an oil-burning or gas-burning appliance or to an electrical heating device unless it can be shown that the total system is designed so that unsafe temperatures or water pressures will not occur with the operation of all or part of the combined system."

The alteration of return ductwork often disrupts the balance of air-flow through the ducts and reduces the effectiveness of the heat distribution system. Also, the heat from the space heater can damage the blower bearings and motor windings of the furnace.


--
.


Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
Place your Award Nominations
here !

Originally Posted By: mlong
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



OK, Paul, you make some very persuasive points. Although I do see the issue of the negative pressurization, I know many times, especially in finished basements that vents are cut into both the supply and the return air ducts, of new systems when they are installed, otherwise, one couldn’t have heat and A/C in the basement. I’m not sure that I totally understand the difference in doing that and having a vent for a freestanding stove. Of course, I suppose keeping the system balanced is the key issue. But if Canadian Codes prohibit the practice of tying freestanding stoves into the house’s central air system, then I suppose it’s a moot point, for Canadians, at least.


I think I'll just concede on this, and recommend referral to the local HVAC professional. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Mark Long
Peace of Mind Home Inspections
http://www.pomhi.net

Originally Posted By: gmulrain
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Thank you. I think that I will tell my buddy to talk to someone with a little more knowledge than I have. It is a good thought but better safe than sorry Thanks again