Process in Taking Property Photos

I just had a quick question out of curiosity. I hear some inspectors say that during a typical inspection they take 300 to 400 pictures. Also hear some say that they take 100 to 200 pictures. I am curious to know what you guys actually take photos of while taking property photos and do you have a process when it comes to taking property or CYA photos. Not including defects. I am just using your responses as a tool to gauge when I’m doing.

Everything, every wall, floor and ceiling. 300-400 photos is about where I’m at for every inspection. I only publish photos with defects or photos of areas the client can’t access easily like roof, attic, crawl.

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I’m usually in the 200 range, but I had one recently that was 600.

Usually 75-80 but only 35 or so in the report.

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Same here, up to 500 photos.

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Usually, around 150 but probably should do more.

Anywhere from 300-500 depending on the house. Some for reference later, some CYA. Only photos of defects/concerns end up in the report.

I used to take 50 to 75 maximum photos od which I would use maybe 1/2 to 2/3.

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I take close to 500 photos. Only about 70 or so make it to the report, but I’ve found that more is better to make sure you have everything covered.

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500? Are you guys photographers or home inspectors?

My wedding had only 10 pictures!

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I typically take around 2-300 pictures, sometimes more for the faint of eye homes. This house I inspected yesterday had quite a bit wrong in only a few systems and I took 300. After talking with @srechkin yesterday though, I could/should have taken more lol!

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Are usually take several photos of each roof plane, all sides of the chimney if it has one driveway, walkway each side of the home and on the interior I just started taking photos of each wall. The kitchen, laundry room, garage, bathroom Fixtures. I need to start taking photos of the ceilings and the floors. Those photos are for CYA and memory.

As far as my knowledge and education goes I don’t miss much, but I had an agent sick two weeks ago send me a photo of a water stain and more growth on the ceiling. I started freaking out because I didn’t remember at the time saying that. So I went back to the report and thank God it was in there. I’m normally around 150 to 200 photos depending on the size of the property and the issues.

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Same here. I’ve avoided paying tens of thousands demanded by clients over the years who’ve accused me of missing something by sending a photo of the unaffected area.

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I take maybe 80-100 for a 1500-1800 square foot home, with about 1/3+ in the report. More if I am doing outbuildings etc. Commercial inspections could be many hundreds.

I use a 360 degree camera and take one picture in each room than go about the inspection and photograph defects that I use in the report.

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I haven’t counted my pics. I take the big overall pics of ceilings, walls, especially obstructions, then specific pics of details for appliances and fixtures, valves, Moisture levels, temperatures etc… you can’t take too many for your proof. I hide most all in a section called additional photos, and only include the deficiencies plus a few pics of the big items … ie AC and data plate, furnace and data plate… I try to keep my report under 40 pages, normally it’s about 32 pages, depending on the number of deficiencies.

I use the camera to take notes. Still only average 100 or so photos. I also photograph the required items: panel interior, shut off valves, etc. Macro mode gives me the serial number shots for equipment and appliances (I include the numbers in the report, not the photos).

Take all the photos and run them through a batch editor that adds my logo and reduces file size. File size can be important depending on how you deliver the report. In MD we have to keep them for 5 years so a reduced file size is important for storage as well as delivery.

There are many times when I wish I had taken just a couple more pictures. The more the merrier.

I also take pictures of scuttle holes before I enter and after I exit as well as pictures of my ladder and the position of the ladder if and when I have to rest it against the closet/interior wall (I always cover the end with a beach towel). Just had a seller throw a fit about a scuff mark on the closet wall :thinking:. After I presented the photos it was clear that the appraiser who came in after me put the very small and insignificant scuff mark on the wall. Added tip is I carry a magic eraser with me for just the occasion. There are some very mentally unstable people out there just protect yourself.

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What is everyone’s best practices as far as storage of pics, devices used and how long do you keep them on file?