Question about the test...

Originally Posted By: Jeffrey Fox
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Unless i misunderstand this question i’m confused…



Which of the following is a legal and commonly used trap
a. bell trap
b. s trap
c. p trap
d. drum trap


We frequently use s traps that drain through the floor and p traps that drain into the wall. Am i doing something illegal here or am i misunderstanding the question. I would think if i could buy it they would be legal. Hell i think i can still even buy a barrel trap.


Originally Posted By: Robert Patterson
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Jeffery,


S Traps are illegal, they allow the water in the trap to go out allowing sewer gasses to get in the house.

Bob

BTW P traps are ok.


Originally Posted By: Jeffrey Fox
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



could you give me a reference so i can tell the guys i work with?? They won’t believe me otherwise. Just wondering why can i still buy one then??


Originally Posted By: lwedige
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



2000 International Residential Code section P3201.5 specifically prohibits the use of “S” traps.



Larry


Originally Posted By: Robert Patterson
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Jeff,


2000 IRC P3201.5 Prohibited trap designs.
Bell traps
S Traps
Drum Traps
Traps designed with moving parts
Seperate fixture traps with interior partitions, except those lavatory traps made of plastic, stainless steel or other corrosion-resistant material

2000 IPC 1002.3 Pr4ohibited traps
Traps that depend on moving parts to maintain the seal
Bell traps
Crown-vent traps
Traps not integral with a fixture and depend on interior partitions for seal, exccept those traps constructed of an approved material that is fresistant to corrosion and degradation.
S Traps
Drum traps.
Exception: Drum traps used as solids interceptors and drum traps serving chemical waste systems shall not be prohibited.

2000 UPC 1004.0 Prohibited
No form of trap which depends for its seal upon the action of movable parts shall be used. No trap which has concealed interior partitions, except those of plastic, glass or simi9lar corrosion resistant material, shall be used. "S" traps, bell traps, crown-vented traps shall be prohibited. No fixture shall be double trapped. Drum and bottle traps may be installed only when permitted by the Administrative Authority for special conditions. No trap shall be installed without a vent, except as otherwise provided in this code.

That's my three, you get to check the local regs. ![icon_cool.gif](upload://oPnLkqdJc33Dyf2uA3TQwRkfhwd.gif)

Bob


Originally Posted By: Jeffrey Fox
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



You learn something new everyday. Thanks.


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I (like most plumbers) don’t know the codes like Bob, but I know an S trap self siphons leaving it dry and allowing sewer gas to enter the home.


Nick (ex plumber)

PS Three other plumbing rules:

1. Hot's on the left.
2. S*** goes down hill.
3. Wash your hands before lunch.


Originally Posted By: lwedige
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



All bathrooms have an S-trap. Just look at the toilet. The S-trap ensures a siphon, then water is added to restore the liquid seal.


Larry (never a plumber)


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Larry:


Yep. I never thought about it though. Now I'm going to think about it every time I .... well, you know.

Nick


Originally Posted By: lwedige
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Nick


It’s nice to be thought of regularly, but this is not how I prefer it.


Larry


Originally Posted By: nlewis
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



There is a question on the test about switches on a bathroom required to be 3 feet from the tub or shower. I thought the switch just had to be outside of the tub or shower itself with no required distance. The NEC does not give a distance. Anybody else remember that question, and did you think it seemed incorrect?


Originally Posted By: rwills
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Neal,


Don’t recall the question myself but perhaps they were confusing switches with outlets. But even then would be wrong! Only code I could find pertained to switches on a wall being a minimum of 5’ from a hot tub! Bob.


Originally Posted By: wwarner
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Neal,


I remember that question and didn't know there was a code for this. I just reasoned on the common sense side of it that a switch should be placed beyond "easy" reach from the tub/shower. (Shouldn't be messin' with an electrical switch while standing in a tub of water!)

Bill


Originally Posted By: jmyers
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



William,


It sounds to me like you are using some good common sense. It could be that other organizations want their members to know the codes, we just want ours to have to good common sense.

You get one ATTA BOY!!

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: dvalley
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I see quite a few drum traps in older basements in my area. I haven’t been writing them up as a red tag or as an item that should be corrected.


Should these drum traps be red tagged or is there a grandfather clause?


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: Chris Morrell
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



All codes typically apply only to new construction. Every house needs not be rewired when a new electrical code comes out, for example.



Chris Morrell


Director of Information Technology


http://www.nachi.org/


![](upload://oQzQ9TDTAR48ysESOhBqusxmXID.html)

Originally Posted By: jremas
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Chris, how are you making out with the references on the online exam? Let me know. Thanks.






Jeff Remas
REMAS Inspections, Inc.
Northeastern PA & the Poconos
www.NEPAinspector.com

570-362-1598

Originally Posted By: mpatton
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Check out this thread on HomeGuage’s BB. This is in reference to the NACHI test. icon_smile.gif


http://www.homegauge.com/inspector/shgi/forumthread.html?forum=4&thread=618

Nick and Chris will enjoy it. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Michael Patton
AA Home Inspection
Serving Northern KY & Greater Cincinnati OH

AA@AAHomeInspection.net
www.AAHomeInspection.net

Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Michael:


NACHIand HomeGauge have recently worked together to provide HomeGauge users the ability to post the NACHI protection agreement (between Inspector and Client) as a custom page, directly on thier own HomeGauge web-sites.

Nick


Originally Posted By: rray
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Why are double traps prohibited and how close would two traps have to be to be considered double trapped? Anyone got a picture of a double trap?


I'd like to see some pictures of these other traps, also. I have only seen P traps, S traps, and no traps.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.