Questions of the week 01/01/17

From code:

Holes in bearing wall studs (exterior and interior walls that bear the weight of the roof and/or other stories above) may not exceed 40 percent of the width of the stud.
Notches in bearing wall studs may not exceed 25 percent of the stud’s width.
Holes in non-bearing walls can’t exceed 60 percent of their width.
Notches in non-bearing walls can’t exceed 40 percent of their width.
The edge of a hole must be at least 5/8 in. from the edge of a stud.

For the pitch pocket question:

From code:

Holes in bearing wall studs (exterior and interior walls that bear the weight of the roof and/or other stories above) may not exceed 40 percent of the width of the stud.
Notches in bearing wall studs may not exceed 25 percent of the stud’s width.
Holes in non-bearing walls can’t exceed 60 percent of their width**.
Notches in non-bearing walls can’t exceed 40 percent of their width.**
The edge of a hole must be at least 5/8 in. from the edge of a stud.

On the pitch pocket:

Write up on pitch pockets here;

Very easy to relate to a built up mopped roof, cause that is when the pitch pocket was started.
It was used for pipes.

I understand the relation to hot tar and built up roofing but still, regardless of the type of roof a pitch pocket is used to waterproof around a pipe.

I am sticking with my answer.

They are used for many other purposes other than plumbing stacks on a “hot tar roof”. RTU stands, refrigerant lines, etc.:cool:

Having the right answers doesn’t necessarily make you the winner.

:D;-)

It did for me, multiple times…

https://www.google.com/search?q=pitch+pocket+around+i+beam&espv=2&biw=1093&bih=541&tbm=isch&imgil=L_gDgrMQrjMwWM%3A%3B7dsdRes79wDtpM%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fconspecmaterials.com%252Fshop%252Fsealants%252Froofing-sealants%252Fchemlink-pourable-1-part-penetration-sealant-64-oz-pouch-half-gallon%252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=L_gDgrMQrjMwWM%3A%2C7dsdRes79wDtpM%2C_&usg=__rPGBRIZYqU-q36Hi6Z-rmBLADs0%3D&ved=0ahUKEwjZ4u2E1b3RAhXkgFQKHc-IAAoQyjcIKA&ei=XQR4WJnAHeSB0gLPkYJQ#imgrc=L_gDgrMQrjMwWM%3A

Interesting, especially the wood beams that call out pitch pockets in the grain.

Tough job that question of the week. I am a stronger man because of it.:wink:

:mrgreen:

Yes, pitch pockets are used in many different applications in the industry.
With the long history of use with the hot tar built-up roof applications it has now been used within the building industry many other applications of different type of roof materials.

  1. A pitch pocket **would most likely be used with **a(n)

If d. would have been the answer, the question would have read most likely as (A pitch pocket is mostly associated and used with a )

a. Concrete slump bucket
b. Skylight
c. Plumbing stack
d. Hot tar roof

I guess one could debate this until one is blue in the face, but we will leave the correct answer to be at the discretion of the one asking the questions. :):wink:

I think the good news is I’m getting better at the questions.
The bad news is I’m not perfect with the questions.

In the long run, my education has grown whether I have been right or wrong.
In the end, I win either way.

When I first found the question I thought a pitch pocket was where the catcher told the pitcher to throw the ball.:mrgreen:

Thanks for devoting your time Paul.

I think I have seen two since I became a HI Paul. It was educational for me as well.

It may be an angle or tube steel used to support ducting or a RTU. It may also be around conduit or refrigeration lines