Septic Inspections

Originally Posted By: rkuntz
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Can someone tell me what is involved in a septic tank inspection? What training is needed? And where can I get training?


I understand that an inspection involves pumping the tank. Who is responsible for this? Is it the sellers responsibilty to have the lid off and tank pumped for the inspector? These are just some of the questions I have...thank you


Originally Posted By: rkuntz
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Can anyone share a copy of their septic dye test reports with me? thank you


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Sure I would send it too you Ronk. Send me your email address and I will get it out to you.


Joe Myers

my email address is under my profile


--
Joe Myers
A & N Inspections, Inc.
http://anii.biz

Originally Posted By: rkuntz
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ronk@pro-spect.biz


Thanks Joe!!


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Its coming, hold on to your hat! :slight_smile:



Joe Myers


A & N Inspections, Inc.


http://anii.biz

Originally Posted By: rkuntz
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Thanks again Joe


Originally Posted By: jremas
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deleted


Originally Posted By: ismetaniuk
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This membership was a big waste of my time!!!



Igor


Top To Bottom Inspections


Glen Spey, NY

Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Jeff,


I think that is a little extreme for my blood. Education is helpful especially if you know nothing about septic systems.

One of the big factors in doing dye and load reporting is not to give your client a false sense of security. You should tell them up front no matter what type of testing the opt for the only certain way to ensure the septic is not broken is to dig which would most likely cost them about a thousand.

Report what you observe and nothing more. I just happen to check the fluid level in the tank, most inspectors that do the dye and load will not even open the lid because of liability.

I do not probe the drain field just because you are more or less taking an educated guess about the field which I feel can be misleading to your clients. If you are comfortable with probing by all means go ahead and do so.

Hope this helps.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: jremas
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deleted


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Jeff,


You are going to make one good darn inspector. You catch on quick...I am a little slow..it takes me a while.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: msaari
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I used to use the dye test too, it’s called a hydrostatic pressure test. But then I started feeling guilty taking everyone’s money knowing it was a useless test so I became certified in Septic Inspections by the Michigan State University. I can’t belive inspectors are still doing the hydrostatic fake testing. The only real way to test a septic system is by the field, and probing the ground with an auger to the washed stone looking for bio-mat is the only way.


Originally Posted By: Scott Patterson
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msaari wrote:
I used to use the dye test too, it's called a hydrostatic pressure test. But then I started feeling guilty taking everyone's money knowing it was a useless test so I became certified in Septic Inspections by the Michigan State University. I can't belive inspectors are still doing the hydrostatic fake testing. The only real way to test a septic system is by the field, and probing the ground with an auger to the washed stone looking for bio-mat is the only way.


I respectfully disagree.

Hydrostatic pressure test; this is used to test for leaks. A device with one or more spray heads and a water gage to measure the flow is set in place (static) and directed at the area in question. Dye can be introduced into the water stream to help in visual identification of the leak..

The only true way to exam a septic tank is to pump it and pull the top. This allows an inspection of the interior baffles and chambers for cracks or other damage.


Originally Posted By: msaari
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I am happy to hear that some inspectors believe in the hydrostatic dye test. The truth to the matter with respect to septic systems is this. In order to get the dye out into the leaching field, there must be a minimum of 150 gallons of water pushed through the septic tank system first, and then it will flow to the leaching filed. The problem with this is that this is exactly what we dont ever want to do to a septic system. Its the overloading of water introduced into the tank that causes the solids to be pushed into the leaching field. Prior to the purging of the septic tank into the field the state that the matter is in is called anarobic. (Meaning no air) it is this state that allows the bacterias to fight and break up solid matter into liquid. Once the air gets introduced it goes into an airobic state. Meaning the bacteria can no longer fight and break the solids. Its this state that we are looking for in the leaching field and it can be found in the washed stone area and is now called the Biomatte. The only way the bio matte can enter the field is by pushing to much water through the system, or by going an exceptional length of time without emptying the septic tank. Regardless, pushing dye by way of a minimum of 150 gallons of water into the tank will always cause more harm than good. And it is also seldom that an inspector will even find the dye area withing the leaching field. My point is this. Dye is a proper test to investigate interior leaks in piping, but it is not an appropriate way to check for septic tank, or septic leaching field failure. Michael B. Saari is an onsite wastewater and septic systems graduate of Michigan State University. Thank you.