Shingel defect or type?

Dwelling built 1990.

The majority of the roofing shingles have this spidering or cracked look.

Is this a type of shingle or defective/worn out shingles?

Thanks

http://www.inspectapedia.com/roof/SplittingShingles.htm:)

Those are cracked shingles, defect. Not a “type”.

Looks like a defective 3- tab spidering, and a cracking to me. ;):slight_smile:

Thanks guys. Standing on the roof it looked almost like a pattern, but as I looked to the edges I could see they were cracked completely through.

Craze crackingis usually not a defect, it’s the result of using poor quality asphalt, often the use of too much filler. Craze cracking is usually limited to the surface cracking and shingles usually reach the end of their warranty before cracking reach the back of the shingle. If cracking is continuous through the shingles and that condition is widespread, the roof needs to be replaced.

how could it not be a defect if it is the result of using poor quality asphalt…I’m confused…

  1. Craze (Map) Cracking - Craze or map cracking of shingles appears as a pattern of roadways similar to a map. Crazed cracking is the result of the normal deterioration of the asphalt coating of the shingles from aging over the years. When the asphalt material dries, shrinks, and weathers from normal exposure to water and sunlight it is randomly stretched. The random stretching of the asphalt causes it to crack in a random pattern.

SDE-16 Shingles exhibit craze or map cracking

http://prugarinc.com/shingles/shingle-damage-evaluation-characteristics-of-aging-part-4c/

:slight_smile:

I have not seen the post’s about just putting on a coat of elastomeric paint lately to extend your shingle life .
I can not imaging how they could ever strip a roof with that on it

It’s like lots of the conditions we see… when does poor quality work or materials stop being poor quality and start being a defect? It’s a judgement call.

With asphalt shingles, the way the insurance companies see it- many of them anyway because some things are not uniform across the insurance industry- is if the shingle will not suffer functional damage from the condition before the end of its warranty, then it’s not defective and they won’t replace it. And they’re the one’s that make the final call.

Functional damage is that which either:

  1. diminishes the ability of the roof to shed water, or
  2. shortens its long-term service life. This is called “premature failure.” The service life is basically the length of the warranty.

Many, many roofs that exhibit craze cracking go on to meet and sometimes exceed their warranty without leaking.

While I was developing the roof courses, I got my information from major insurance companies and spent a great deal of time researching it, talking to various other experts and trying to decide what to tell inspectors about it, and this is what I came up with.

There are very good inspectors out there who call craze cracking a defect. Joe Hagerty is one. And also, things are not always the same. What’s true in one instance is not always true. Sorry James, the simple answers aren’t always complete.

Mot of these are a couple of pages long if you want to learn more about the details.

Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 1
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 2
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 3
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 4
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 5
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 6
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 7
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 8
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 9
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 10
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 11
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 12
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 13
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 14
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 15
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 16
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 17
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 18
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 21
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 25
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 26
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 28
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 30
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 31
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 33
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 35
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 47
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 49
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 50
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 51
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 52
Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 53
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Mastering Roof Inspections: Asphalt Composition Shingles, Part 55

From Mastering Roof Inspections - InterNACHI http://www.nachi.org/mastering-roof-inspections.htm#ixzz2ZdjGYril

Close, Marcel. Volatiles are the compounds used in asphalt to make it waterproof and flexible. Over time, due mostly to heat, they evaporate. As they evaporate, the asphalt loses mass and shrinks.

Because evaporation happens faster at the surface of the shingle, which is exposed to air and direct sunlight (heat), it shrinks faster than the underlying portions of asphalt that form the thickness of the shingle. The difference in shrinkage rates between the asphalt surface layer and the underlying asphalt creates tension that is relieved by cracking. This is why it tends to effect mainly the surface layer and not crack through, which technically would be a “split”.

The same process creates shrinkage cracks in concrete and cracks called “checking” in the logs used for log homes.

well that explains a lot …insurance companies don’t always have a firm grasp on reality imho…

They are able to inflict their reality on the public in a very lucrative manner.

Actually, going into that project I was very pessimistic about insurance companies in general, but I wound up being very impressed with the insurance people I worked with who were from, or worked directly with, the major companies, Farmers in particular.

Granted there are some companies about which there are widespread complaints, but you know, the more you learn about that industry, and I only am familiar with the parts that deal with roofing, the more you realize that it’s not as simple as you thought.

When my nephew was in high school he loaned his car to a couple of friends who ran it off a backwoods Montana road at about 90 mph. Both girls almost died. Farmers insured the car and handled everything beautifully. I can’t say enough good things about that company.

The original picture is…
CertainTeed Horizon Shangle
Defective Roof… Strip and Replace…

Thanks to all that replied here, very informative read, much appreciated.

Jim

Yes thank you