Splices are permitted to be concealed in MB's

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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This shows a type of nonmetallic-sheathed cable "Romex" connector used for interconnecting modules in a manufacturing building that can be concealed at the time of on-site assembly.

They are not permitted for use on conventional construction where concealed. Splices are to be made in various enclosures. Code references available upon request if they relate to the Home Inspector who is responsible for the NACHI SOP.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: bbadger
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Well I hate to start a fight but I disagree, I believe these are now allowed in ‘normal’ construction.



Bob Badger


Electrical Construction & Maintenance


Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Bob, they closed that loophole.This shopwed up in 1999 code I believe and it was 336.21 that allowed those “Everrflex” connectors to be concealed or fished with NM. That was totally reworded in 2002 when the sections were renumbered and the loophole dissapeared.


The everflex is addressed in 550.19 and 550.15(K) now.


Have you actually looked at one? It is an insulation displacement device like those blue beanies they hook up trailer lights with on cars.


I called a guy from Amp and had him send me some samples in the 99 code cycle when this came up.


Originally Posted By: bbadger
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OK I will lay out why I feel this way.


First from ULs web site.

http://ulstandardsinfonet.ul.com/outscope/2256.html

Quote:
NONMETALLIC SHEATHED CABLE INTERCONNECTS

1 Scope
1.1 These requirements cover interconnects consisting of mating insulating enclosures which are assembled to nonmetallic sheathed cable and form both a mechanical and electrical connection. This forms a contained product for component interconnections for use in exposed or concealed locations in accordance with the National Electrical Code (NEC), ANSI/NFPA-70, Article 545, Manufactured Buildings; Article 550, Mobile Homes; Article 551, Recreational Vehicles And Recreational Vehicle Parks, and for tap devices in accordance with Article 336, Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM, NMC, and NMS.

1.2 The enclosures of these interconnects are complete without openings and are intended for use without an outlet box or enclosure.

1.3 These requirements cover interconnects intended for use at 600 volts ac or less on 15 and 20 ampere branch circuits wired with Nos. 14 and 12 AWG (2.1 and 3.3 mm2 ) copper conductors, respectively.

1.4 A product that contains features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems new or different from those covered by the requirements in this Outline of Investigation, and that involves a risk of fire or of electric shock or injury to persons, shall be evaluated using appropriate additional component and end-product requirements to maintain the level of safety as originally anticipated by the intent of this Outline of Investigation. A product whose features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems conflict with specific requirements or provisions of this Outline of Investigation does not comply with this Outline of Investigation. Revision of requirements shall be proposed and adopted in conformance with the methods employed for development, revision, and implementation of this Outline of Investigation.


Now this makes reference to Article 336 which at the time this statement was written was the NM cable Article.

The tap devices refereed to in the 336 of the 1999 NEC are the same ones referred to in 2005 NECs

Quote:
300.15 Boxes, Conduit Bodies, or Fittings ? Where Required.
A box shall be installed at each outlet and switch point for concealed knob-and-tube wiring.
Fittings and connectors shall be used only with the specific wiring methods for which they are designed and listed.
Where the wiring method is conduit, tubing, Type AC cable, Type MC cable, Type MI cable, nonmetallic-sheathed cable, or other cables, a box or conduit body complying with Article 314 shall be installed at each conductor splice point, outlet point, switch point, junction point, termination point, or pull point, unless otherwise permitted in 300.15(A) through (M).

(H) Insulated Devices. As permitted in 334.40(B), a box or conduit body shall not be required for insulated devices supplied by nonmetallic-sheathed cable.


Now a look at 334.40(B)


Quote:
334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Material. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the cable is concealed and fished. Openings in such devices shall form a close fit around the outer covering of the cable, and the device shall fully enclose the part of the cable from which any part of the covering has been removed. Where connections to conductors are by binding-screw terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as conductors.


If Joe would share the make and model numbers of the product in the picture we could look up the UL listing which I believe will be "NONMETALLIC-SHEATHED CABLE INTERCONNECTORS (QAAV)"


Bob


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: bbadger
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Here is an snippet from the trade magazine EC&M


http://bg.ecmweb.com/ar/electric_nonmetallic_cable_splice/

Quote:
The NM Splice and Tap technology provides a fast and reliable way to connect 12 AWG and 14 AWG circuits using nonmetallic (NM) cable. It eliminates the need for junction boxes, covers, fittings, and wire nuts. It?s approved for use in a variety of applications, including residential branch circuits, manufactured housing, and pre-fabricated building structures. When adding new circuits in residential applications, NM connectors eliminate both the need to cut into the existing wiring and the extra junction boxes and associated hardware required for the tap connection.


Times, rules and listings change. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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icon_smile.gif


Hi.Bob, hope you are well.

This NM splice, obviously is approved for residential use, would it be approved for commercial use, seeing that is what I am more evolved in?

Why would it be that over the years, I have never come across this technology, of this nature in Maine , residential or commercial setting?

You seem to have done your homework on this one, and appreciate the input of information.

Thanks,

Marcel


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Pass & Seymour/Legrand? makes this product and the picture is in the NECH at 545.13.



Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant


www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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You are right Bob. I missed that in the 334 rewrite. I’m not sure who told me it was gone.


When this first showed up I heard it was a way to pigtail NM-b to an old run of NM for a ceiling light and push the splice up into the ceiling. I guess it is still there. I have still never actually seen one installed. I do still have my samples.


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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http://catalog.tycoelectronics.com/TE/bin/TE.Connect?C=11621&F=0&M=CINF&GIID=0&LG=1&I=13&RQS=C~11621^P~^M~PROP^N~1^IDS~101056,101057,101058,102127,65566,49659,65567,49660,65565,101177,74034


It is "enerflex"


Originally Posted By: bbadger
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mcyr wrote:
This NM splice, obviously is approved for residential use, would it be approved for commercial use, seeing that is what I am more evolved in?


Morning Marcel, The way I read it you can use this anywhere NM is permitted.

mcyr wrote:
Why would it be that over the years, I have never come across this technology, of this nature in Maine , residential or commercial setting?


I have never seen one of these in person either. I am thinking of ordering a set for the truck.

These could be very handy when having to tap into an existing NM run that has no slack for a 'normal' box and tap.

They make a tap version of these just for that purpose.

mcyr wrote:
You seem to have done your homework on this one, and appreciate the input of information.


I should say this is not the first time I have researched these products.


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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jtedesco wrote:
![](upload://obObpPIGWx29gXqRrve0bi4G1oZ.jpeg)

This shows a type of nonmetallic-sheathed cable "Romex" connector used for interconnecting modules in a manufacturing building that can be concealed at the time of on-site assembly.

They are not permitted for use on conventional construction where concealed. Splices are to be made in various enclosures. Code references available upon request if they relate to the Home Inspector who is responsible for the NACHI SOP.


Quote:
Meets requirements of National Electrical Code, Articles 545, 550, 551


Again, They are not permitted for use on conventional construction where concealed.

http://catalog.tycoelectronics.com/TE/bin/TE.Connect?C=11621&F=0&M=CINF&GIID=0&LG=1&I=13&RQS=C~11621


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: bbadger
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jtedesco wrote:

Again, They are not permitted for use on conventional construction where concealed. ![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)


Joe, in my humble opinion 2005 NEC 334.40(B) allows these to be used in 'normal' construction exposed and concealed when rewiring.

Quote:
334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Material. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the cable is concealed and fished. Openings in such devices shall form a close fit around the outer covering of the cable, and the device shall fully enclose the part of the cable from which any part of the covering has been removed. Where connections to conductors are by binding-screw terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as conductors.


Clearly the UL statement I linked to

http://ulstandardsinfonet.ul.com/outscope/2256.html

shows us these are the tap devices referenced in 334.40(B).

We will just have to agree to disagree on this and let people make their own call based on the code references.

Bob


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Bob:


From your UL link:
Quote:
.... and for tap devices in accordance with Article 336, Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM, NMC, and NMS.


The 336 rule you reference is for the old surface mounted types of Brown Bakelite Switches, and Receptacles.

Types NM, NMC, and NMS are no longer permitted by the NEC. They must be identified as Types NM-B, NMC-B, and NMS-B


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: bbadger
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jtedesco wrote:

The 336 rule you reference is for the old surface mounted types of Brown Bakelite Switches, and Receptacles.


Here is 1999 Article 336-21

Quote:
336-21 Devices of Insulating Material
Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the cable is concealed and fished. Openings in such devices shall form a close fit around the outer covering of the cable and the device shall fully enclose the part of the cable from which any part of the covering has been removed.
Where connections to conductors are by binding-screw terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as conductors.


I do agree that 336-21 covers switches and receptacles but it also covers tap devices.

I believe 1999s 336-21 is now clearly 2005s 334.40(B).

Again this is all just my opinion and I could be mistaken. I have admitted I have not personally used these devices. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


Yes now NM is called NM-B, I do not see the relevance to this thread.


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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I remember when this device was released and the furor it started. I see it hasn’t changed. I know the AHJs here in Florida were not accepting it in regular construction but I also agree with Bob that the language is not really there to reject it. I thought they had changed the language but it just moved.


I do notice Amp is not saying it is 334.40 compliant now. They used to cite 336-21 in the ad.


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Quote:
Guide Information
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.GuideInfo

MOLEX INC
MOLEX INDUSTRIAL DIV
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.E182087

PASS & SEYMOUR INC
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.E146159

TYCO ELECTRONICS CORP
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.E57250

WIELAND ELECTRIC GMBH
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.E167272

WIRECON, DIV OF
HUBBELL INC (DELAWARE)
Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable Interconnectors
QAAV.E140469


These are the manufacturers who make this product.

Show me where they say that their product is listed for and can be used in an ordinary dwelling unit!

![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: bbadger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



jtedesco wrote:

These are the manufacturers who make this product.

Show me where they say that their product is listed for and can be used in an ordinary dwelling unit!

![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)


Joe the NEC says so directly in 334.40(B).

Part of 334.40(B) 2005 NEC
Quote:
tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the cable is concealed and fished


And it says so in the article in EC&M

Quote:
It?s approved for use in a variety of applications, including residential branch circuits


And when you follow the listing in the UL white book it is not prohibited in any way. All the UL white book says is to use them per the NEC.


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



This is what that 336 rule permits.


![](upload://lHcLBLmQ87z2JbeMBXtXAtN0Ynk.jpeg)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: bbadger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



jtedesco wrote:
This is what that 336 rule permits.



Yes I am sure that is correct.

That would be a type of receptacle allowed by 336-21 (1999) or 334.40(B) (2002, 2005).

Those same articles also refer to taps. The devices in the pictures are NM taps.

If you read this UL statement http://ulstandardsinfonet.ul.com/outscope/2256.html you see that NM-Interconnectors are also called taps by UL.

Bob


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN