Starting from scratch!

My journey has begun! Just passed the first course. I’m very excited and scared and anxious all at once. But here’s to jumping in with both feet. #newbie
25 years in construction will hopefully help!
What is one thing you could tell me that you wish somebody would’ve told you when you first started?

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Use common sense and don’t over think or try to analyze the scope of what this occupation does. Especially from your background.

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Participate on this forum! You can learn a lot and also get to know some good people.

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Fully understand your agreements, insurance and scope of work. Report writing (tech in general) is the hardest part aside from drumming up business.

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Welcome to the forum Brad.
Best of luck with your endeavors.
I sure wish I would have started inspecting after 25 years in the building trades. Unfortunately I waited 35 years. LOL
It can help.

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To Join InterNachi.

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Take your time. If you do not know something do not guess. Do research or come here for answers.

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Hi Brad, The main transition I found was that in construction you are results/project oriented and that with home inspections it will be a necessity to become more of a people oriented person.

Not only personal interactions, but also report writing - most of your clients will have limited building science and not have your background (you will unconsciously assume they know basics, at least I did at first). In order to translate your past experience and knowledge you will have to almost learn to inspect your clients to see where they are at.

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Research is key. Also, the gradual art of report writing.

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Thank you John for your wisdom! (And everyone else!)
Very good point I hadn’t really considered. I am also a pastor so I’m already in the people business. Cultivating relationships is key in ministry.

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With your construction background and people skills you have the foundation to succeed Brad.

I luckily had the foresight to get some before it was needed, but always keep toilet paper in your vehicle. There won’t be any at many new construction/vacant properties you arrive at right after you finish your morning coffee.

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Good one! Inspectors do need an EDC checklist outside of tools.
Toilet paper
Change of clothing
Extra shoes
SEVERAL towels
Rain gear
If you wear glasses, get a second pair for the truck
Personal protection (and I am not talking about condoms, but…)
Battery jump box
Extra Coat

All I have for now

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Yea, I’ve got almost all of those things most of the time. Some of those things you wouldn’t initially think you’d need can really throw a wrench in the gears if you need it and don’t have it.

I didn’t have towels on me the first time I had a dishwasher drain leak. I had to use my coveralls to soak it up :grimacing:

Another item I regularly keep stocked is a value sized bag of gum. I don’t want to talk in the clients face for ten minutes with horrible coffee breath.

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The first time I had to grab my pos drone out of the air because it quit responding to the controller, I learned to pack a few bandaids in my bag. Turns out spinning propellers can do some damage.

I’ve had to use the bandaids a few times since for other mishaps.

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I can’t believe I forgot this. I have carried a bandaid in my wallet for 40 years. (not the same one the whole time :slight_smile: )

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I had to run to Home Depot and get a 18’ collapsible pole to fish mine out of a tree one time. Hopefully I won’t need it again.

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