Wood-Destroying Organism Inspection Course

(Ben J. Gromicko) #1

This thread is dedicated exclusively for those students currently enrolled in the InterNACHI course titled, "Wood-Destroying Organism Inspection Course" located at http://www.nachi.org/wdocourse.htm

Thank you.

(Chad Norlen, CPI) #2

This is from Chapter 17: Foundation Structures

http://education.nachi.org/coursemedia/course-52/images/arrows%20indicate%20supported%20slab%20found.jpg

*Figure 108. A structure with a floating slab and hollow concrete block foundation wall with arrows indicating potential termite entry points *

This is a picture of a supported slab repeated from Figure 106.

Thanks!

(Chad Norlen, CPI) #3

Found another error in Chapter 20: Basic Construction Terminology

fascia: horizontal boards attached to rafter/truss ends at the roof eaves and along gables. Gutters are typically attached to the fascia. Fascia boards are commonly attacked by carpenter bees.

Should be the *vertical *boards, or the gutters won't catch the runoff very well:mrgreen:!

Thanks

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #4

The vertical update has been made. Waiting for researchers to decide about floating slab PIC.

(Ben J. Gromicko) #5

Here’s InterNACHI’s definition of “fascia,” which is a term used in architecture to refer to a frieze or band running horizontally and situated vertically under the roof edge or which forms the outer surface of a cornice and is visible to an outside observer. This is to say that the long dimension of the surface is horizontal and the short dimension is vertical. Gutters are typically attached to the fascia. Fascia boards are commonly attacked by carpenter bees.

http://www.nachi.org/glossary/f.htm

Picture 165.png

  • click this small screen shot above*
(Ben J. Gromicko) #6

[quote="gromicko, post:4, topic:59159"]

The vertical update has been made. Waiting for researchers to decide about floating slab PIC.
[/QUOTE]

The "fascia" definition within the course has been returned to its original, with an update of the definition.

fascia: a term used in architecture to refer to a frieze or band running horizontally and situated vertically under the roof edge or which forms the outer surface of a cornice and is visible to an outside observer. This is to say that the long dimension of the surface is horizontal and the short dimension is vertical. Gutters are typically attached to the fascia. Fascia boards are commonly attacked by carpenter bees.

(Ben J. Gromicko) #7

[quote="cnorlen, post:2, topic:59159"]

...
*Figure 108. A structure with a floating slab and hollow concrete block foundation wall with arrows indicating potential termite entry points *

This is a picture of a supported slab repeated from Figure 106.

Thanks!
[/QUOTE]

Chad,
Good catch. Thank you.
That was indeed simply a repeated illustration from a few paragraphs prior. A new illustration has been inserted (below).

http://education.nachi.org/coursemedia/course-52/images/arrows%20floating%20with%20hollow%20conc%20block.jpg

Figure 108. A structure with a floating slab and hollow concrete block foundation wall with arrows indicating potential termite entry points (illustration courtesy of MSUE)

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #8

Thanks Ben, thanks Chad!

(Ben J. Gromicko) #9

http://education.nachi.org/coursemedia/course-52/images/tube%202.JPG

Termite tube on sill plate

When looking for signs of termite activity, the inspector must be alert to those conditions that favor termite infestation. The most critical condition is wood-to-soil contact.

(Robert Young) #10

Thanks Ben.
Maybe IAC2 should have a similar thread.
JMO.

(Mike Keefer) #11

I just finished the wdo course. Where can I find out if there is anything else I need to complete before I can do wdo inspections in pa.

(John Harrison, CMI) #12

[quote="mkeefer, post:11, topic:59159"]

I just finished the wdo course. Where can I find out if there is anything else I need to complete before I can do wdo inspections in pa.
[/QUOTE]

In Iowa you have to be certified as a pesticide applicator in order to do Inspections.
I see on your states DNR website there is a pesticide applicators certification, you may want to start there.

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us

(Robert Young) #13

[quote="bgromicko, post:9, topic:59159"]

http://education.nachi.org/coursemedia/course-52/images/tube%202.JPG

Termite tube on sill plate

When looking for signs of termite activity, the inspector must be alert to those conditions that favor termite infestation. The most critical condition is wood-to-soil contact.
[/QUOTE]

Nice photo Ben. You have to know what you are looking at to understand the mud tub.

(Bryce W. Jeffrey, CMI) #14

????

(Gregg Spear, 926) #15

[quote="cnorlen, post:3, topic:59159"]

Found another error in Chapter 20: Basic Construction Terminology

fascia: horizontal boards attached to rafter/truss ends at the roof eaves and along gables. Gutters are typically attached to the fascia. Fascia boards are commonly attacked by carpenter bees.

Should be the *vertical *boards, or the gutters won't catch the runoff very well:mrgreen:!

Thanks
[/QUOTE]

Hey guys,

Correct me if I am wrong, but the facia board is typically attached across the ends of the rafter tails and the gutter is then mounted onto the facia board. This would actually be in the horizontal position in that it runs parallel to the house at the lowest edge of the roof pitch. The downspouts from the gutter to the ground run vertically.

Thanks,

Gregg Spear
Spear Home Inspection, Inc.
InterNACHI member

(Ben J. Gromicko) #16

[quote="gspear, post:15, topic:59159"]

Hey guys,

Correct me if I am wrong, but the facia board is typically attached across the ends of the rafter tails and the gutter is then mounted onto the facia board. This would actually be in the horizontal position in that it runs parallel to the house at the lowest edge of the roof pitch. The downspouts from the gutter to the ground run vertically.

Thanks,

Gregg Spear
Spear Home Inspection, Inc.
InterNACHI member
[/QUOTE]

Fascia: http://www.nachi.org/glossary/f.htm The board runs horizontally and is installed vertically...

(Ben J. Gromicko) #17

Course definition of fascia has been edited. It now reads:

  • fascia: The band running horizontally and positioned vertically under a roof edge, or that which forms the outer surface of a cornice. This is to say that the long dimension of the surface is horizontal and the short dimension is vertical. The fascia board caps the rafter ends of a roof structure and may be used to hold a gutter. The area below the fascia may be referred to as the eave or soffit. Fascia boards are commonly attacked by carpenter bees.

That sounds a little better. Yes?

(Gregg Spear, 926) #18

[quote="gspear, post:15, topic:59159"]

Hey guys,

Correct me if I am wrong, but the facia board is typically attached across the ends of the rafter tails and the gutter is then mounted onto the facia board. This would actually be in the horizontal position in that it runs parallel to the house at the lowest edge of the roof pitch. The downspouts from the gutter to the ground run vertically.

Thanks,

Gregg Spear
Spear Home Inspection, Inc.
InterNACHI member
[/QUOTE]

Me again

Being new to this forum and actually posting something, I guess it is good to check the post dates before responding to them.

Thanks
Gregg

(Ben J. Gromicko) #19

[quote="gspear, post:18, topic:59159"]

Me again

Being new to this forum and actually posting something, I guess it is good to check the post dates before responding to them.

Thanks
Gregg
[/QUOTE]

No problem, Gregg. Thanks for contributing.

(Howard S. Kaufman, 16000057431) #20

[quote="bgromicko, post:1, topic:59159"]

This thread is dedicated exclusively for those students currently enrolled in the InterNACHI course titled, "Wood-Destroying Organism Inspection Course" located at http://www.nachi.org/wdocourse.htm

Thank you.
[/QUOTE]

Does a licensed inspector have to be a licensed applicator to complete form NPNA-33?