Asbestos -- always recommend a lab to confirm?

Did a home inspection – 1930 home, radiators for heat… all the pipes coming off the boiler are covered with insulation obviously “could” be asbestos (probably is)… Here is the question – when there is a logo on the insulation that says “Ambler Asbestos Company” (see pic) – do you still recommend a lab to confirm? In my report I went with the standard “could be, recommend a lab” - but I showed my clients during the inspection what I had found, explained to them what I believed it to be, answered their questions, etc… I’m just wondering if anyone ever says “IT IS ASBESTOS”…

If it looks like a duck and quacks like duck?
It is probably a duck.
If it has a sign around its neck stating “duck”?
I’m not sure

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I have to ask. Do you call out everything you suspect may be asbestos? Because in the US at least it still isn’t banned. Any building material may still contain asbestos.
Fun fact
Besides I’m bored :neutral_face:

40 CFR § 763.165 - Manufacture and importation prohibitions.

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§ 763.165 Manufacture and importation prohibitions.

(a) After August 27, 1990, no person shall manufacture or import the following asbestos-containing products, either for use in the United States or for export: flooring felt and new uses of asbestos.

(b) After August 26, 1996, no person shall manufacture or import the following asbestos-containing products, either for use in the United States or for export: commercial paper, corrugated paper, rollboard, and specialty paper.

© The import prohibitions of this subpart do not prohibit:

(1) The import into the customs territory of the United States of products imported solely for shipment outside the customs territory of the United States, unless further repackaging or processing of the product is performed in the United States; or

(2) Activities involving purchases or acquisitions of small quantities of products made outside the customs territory of the United States for personal use in the United States.

[59 FR 33209, June 28, 1994]

I myself would not go the asbestos test route unless it was friable or damaged etc. But I don’t know 🤷.

I know I’ll get flak so… Does anyone know the statistics of a homeowner that did not work with asbestos or the manufacturer of asbestos acquiring any confirmed asbestos related diseases?

Source CPSC

This information will help you understand asbestos. What it is, its health effects, where it is in your home, and what to do about it. Even if asbestos is in your home, this is usually NOT a serious problem. The mere presence of asbestos in a home or a building is not hazardous. The danger is that asbestos materials may become damaged over time. Damaged asbestos may release asbestos fibers and become a health hazard.

THE BEST THING TO DO WITH ASBESTOS MATERIAL IN GOOD CONDITION IS TO LEAVE IT ALONE!

Disturbing it may create a health hazard where none existed before. Read this before you have any asbestos material inspected, removed, or repaired

Yep good ol copy and paste.

I wonder if I sound snarky? I don’t mean to.

What Charles said^^^^^^^^^^^^

THE BEST THING TO DO WITH ASBESTOS MATERIAL IN GOOD CONDITION IS TO LEAVE IT ALONE!

Cheers

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Retired and living the dream :grinning:
Love it

Actually I go with a standard statement in both my Inspection agreement and my report that I don’t test for things like Lead Paint, Asbestos, etc. If I find something (like in this case) I explain to my clients what I found and it’s best to leave it alone…

That said – I also found this… You just gotta love when you find a clothes hanger supporting galvanized pipes by attaching to the radiator lines above that are covered with asbestos… (Yes it was called out)

No. Pretty much nothing is made of asbestos. Over the years, especially before 1978, it was common for some types of products used in home construction to contain some percentage of asbestos.

Don’t tell them not to test but educate them:

  1. Make sure that they have a realistic idea of the health hazard represented by the product that may contain it. This means making sure that they understand that it’s only dangerous when inhaled. Vinyl floors and fiber-cement siding may represent low hazard.
  2. Make sure they understand how common it is. Typically in drywall compound installed before about 1980 and pretty much all compound manufactured before 1978, vinyl flooring before mid-1960s, fiber-cement roofing and siding pre-mid 50s, vermiculite insulation… that sort of thing.
  3. Make sure that they know that if they confirm its presence, in most states they’ll be required to disclose it when they sell, and
  4. It can be extremely expensive to remove and dispose of.

To protect them, make sure they understand that if they perform any demolition of drywall in houses built pre-1981, they should assume asbestos in the drywall compound and learn about and exercise adequate precautions.

Bear in mind that in EPA regulations concerning asbestos, the percentage of asbestos in the compound is considered as a percentage of the drywall assembly (meaning the drywall and compound), not just the compound. This means that if asbestos forms 5% of the compound, it will form a much, much smaller percentage of the drywall assembly and may not fall within the 1% asbestos content window of EPA regulations.

Here’s the actual EPA page if you want to go through it.

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