Drip Loop Concern or Not?

Hello all! Would love some feedback on this…while I am fairly confident that water will not enter down the masthead, I am more concerned about water entering the splices from the SEC and service drops. Or am I over thinking this? Thanks in advance for your input.

No problem with the drip loop, Chris.

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Also, welcome to our forum, Chris!..Enjoy! :smile:

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Welcome to the forum, Chris. Enjoy!!

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Nothing to comment on that picture in my opinion.

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I really don’t see a drip loop on those connections . Water will eventually find the way to reach those connected wires and will create a fire . Should definately be called for evaluation from a licensed electrician .

I agree with Larry and Marcel no issue with the drip loop.

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The drip loop is intended to keep water from getting into the pipe or cable and running down into the meter or panel. Those are outdoor connections that can get wet. Don’t call out further evaluation on something simple if it needs to be fixed - they hired you for an opinion not to get an electrician to give them an opinion.

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Sorry but I don’t agree , any connections as the ones showing can get penetrated by water specially with freezing and towing in the colder weather . We are hired to give an opinion but also to keep customers safe and ourself with a peace of mind and free from lawsuits . Unless you are a former electrical contractor ( I AM NOT ) an evaluation from a licensed electrician in a situation like that is my recommendation 100% of the times and many times cost the customer nothing . Better to be safe than sorry .
Good luck .
Franco .

Hello Franco,
Welcome to the forum.
I my view, your statement that water “will create a fire” is not an “opinion”. Confidently dishing out such misinformation will not protect your customers and may have several negative outcomes such as but not limited to:

  1. additional expense to your customer to hire a licensed electrician
  2. delays in closing to hire a licensed electrician
  3. damaged reputation with your customer, realtor(s), and others when the electrician gives their report
  4. damaged public reputation when your customer writes poor reviews on google/yelp/etc.

I don’t know if you pay any attention to the credentials of some of the guys who responded before you, but you might want to check that out, especially Robert Meier’s.

This is a great place to learn from specialists and those with lots of experience. I know I certainly have learned a lot by reading their answers to questions posted here.

Again, welcome to the group. I hope you stay and read and learn.

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1: SE termination splice missing protective cover. Only green tape showing.
2: Only Overhead SEC on the mast. Appears other telecommunications cables are being supported.

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Good point about the communication wires which are not permitted on the mast. Connections at the service point are typically installed by the utility, most use some sort of insulating covers as you’ve suggested. My guess is that they wouldn’t even bother to touch this.

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You could possibly be right but 2 things .

  1. the electrician or contractors in general usually don’t charge to give a quote on a possible job .
  2. what if something happens after the customer buys the house ? Don’t you think someone ( the inspector ) will get sued ? Safety first .

Franco those connections are rated for there use.

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That’s true. Those connectors are hydraulically pressed to mechanically bond the two conductors together. Even without covers or insulation they are designed to work as shown in the photo. That’s the reason why the neutral conductors almost never have a cover on them, it’s simply not needed to keep water out of the connector.

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I really appreciate everyone’s perspective and feedback on my question. Thank you!

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We are not here to argue . We all know the way those connections are done but as far as i can see , any joint can fail so it should be protected a little better with a drip loop or equal to prevent water from flowing in that direction . I personally would call it for an evaluation , if you don’t think is necessary , don’t call it .

I agree no argument just a friendly discussion. As an HI you can call out whatever you want. Bert gave a list of reasons not to call this out but to each his own.

I will reiterate that the connections shown in the photo exist in hundreds of thousands of homes without any problems because they are designed and installed just as you see them.

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Franco - I think you are missing the point here. This has been an incredibly civil discourse for this forum and pretty much everyone has chimed in giving you a different perspective on your post statements. If I was going to listen to anyone here it would be this guy - Robert Meier - did you see his credentials “New Jersey HHS Licensed Electrical Inspector, Licensed Electrical Sub-code Official, Licensed Electrical Contractor, Chief Moderator Emeritus Mike Holt Code Forum”

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Alan,
Thanks for the kind words but please do not take my words as anything more than them being my opinion based on my education and experience. An HI should not avoid calling something out because some guy on a forum said not to. My posts are food for thought and are at times just here to give someone a different perspective or clarify something that is not understood.

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