Electrical Safety

:wink: Seeing that I am a person accused of spreading propaganda and have been known to be associated with some of those from the evil empire - my good deed for the day is offering you the following:
http://www.esao.on.ca/clients/safety_specific/Electrical/Electrical%20Draft%20Policy%20and%20Procedures.pdf

Hopefully no harm was caused to one or all…in this sacrifial offering!

Claude,
Excellent material… one thing in you paper, I ask… (page 7} where can one find, thicker, heavier electrically rated leather gloves.

Also the next paragraph… #4 states… Wear non-conductive head protection… so what do I do with the metal plate in my head… I already avoid magnet factories!:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

We are not working on panels, we are only examining them. I think these rules apply to actual electricians working on high voltage systems and not home electrical panels.

Have you ever tried opening a panel wearing leather gloves? I haven’t seen any electricians working on home panels wearing gloves, let alone the other equipment described.

This document is misleading as it relates to home inspections imo.

I don’t agree with it either, but it does not make it OK. I beg to differ, that is the message being delivered by ESA. One only consider the potential consequences of the Occupational Health & Safety Act. I have been to several education sessions where the ESA speaker has clearly pointed out the potential for electrical dangers.

There already have been incidences in Ontario where the Ministry of Labour has threatened home inspectors for opening electrical service panels in a home, - unsafely.

All it takes is a simple “arc” flash, and there could be serious, if not lethal harm. Without the the proper PPE (personal protective equipment) the inspector has not even complied with the first basic step in meeting the basic safety requirements mandated by law in the OH&S Act & Regulations!

Read more on fused leads for multi-meter testers, and other helpful news flash notices.
http://www.esasafe.com/Flash_Notices.php

Are these rules to apply to home inspectors? It certainly doesn’t read that way. Again show me an electrician working on a home electrical system who is wearing all these safety items.

Ministry of Labour has also nailed people working on roofs for not having tie offs and harnesses.

Ministry of Labour has hired 200 additional inspectors across Ontario.

There have been more inspectors injured/killed from falls from roofs. Personally I feel safer inspecting panels than walking roofs more than one story. I will no longer walk on roofs that are not accessible with my 10’ folding ladder.

This link might be more suitable rather than an article from ESA that is not referencing non invasive, visual testing.

http://www.inspect-ny.com/electric/ElecSafety.htm

Thanks Claude!
Below is one I posted over a year ago from OAHI .
Guess it is a good time to post again… Cookie

**Ontario Association of Home Inspectors
*Established by the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors Act, 1994
***Box 38108, Castlewood R.P.O., Toronto, Ontario M5N 3A8
Tel: (416) 256-0960 or 1-888-744-6244 • Fax: (905) 771-1079
Email: oahi@oahi.com **• **Web Site: www.oahi.com
Notice to OAHI Members
Subject: Prohibition - Removing covers of live electrical components
Ontario Regulation 627/05 made under the Occupational Health and Safety Act became
effective in April, 2006. This regulation allows only licensed electricians to work near
exposed energized electrical components, and when doing so they require approved
protective clothing and equipment to reduce the risk from arc-flash. Similar arc-flash
requirements exist in NFPA 70E and may soon become continent wide requirements.
OAHI members should understand that this regulation was not specifically targeted at
home inspectors, but rather attempts to reduce electrically related accidents and
improper electrical installations conducted by unqualified individuals.
The practical implication for Ontario home inspectors is that panel covers should only be
removed if the power within the distribution panel enclosure is first turned off. Whether
home inspectors or other non-electricians can legally remove a cover of a de-energized
panel, or even a receptacle or light switch cover plate is subject to interpretation of the
regulations by the regulatory authority.
The bottom line - If a home inspector is injured, causes damage by nicking or shorting a
conductor, or if a disgruntled client, seller, or other person complains to the Ministry of
Labour, then the home inspector would likely be prosecuted and subject to substantial
fines.
The OAHI takes the position that if the panel cover can not be removed, home
inspectors can not perform an adequate inspection of the electrical system and should
advise the client accordingly. The OAHI was not consulted prior to the enactment of this
regulation and contends that the magnitude of the electrical problems discovered by
home inspectors has saved lives and improved electrical safety, and our safety record
over the past 20 years should merit continuation of our accessing distribution panels.
The OAHI is trying to resolve this issue with the Ministry of Labour as well as ESA which
has overlapping jurisdiction.
Members should also remember that this regulation supersedes the requirements in the
Standards of Practice to access electrical panels.

Regulation 627/05 Extracts
183. Every reasonable precaution shall be taken to prevent hazards to workers from
energized electrical equipment, installations and conductors.
191. (1) This section applies instead of section 190 if work is to be done on or near
energized exposed parts of electrical equipment or of an electrical installation or
conductor and,
(a) it is not reasonably possible to disconnect the equipment, installation or
conductor from the power supply before working on or near the energized exposed
parts;
(b) the equipment, installation or conductor is rated at a nominal voltage of 600
volts or less, and disconnecting the equipment, installation or conductor would create a
greater hazard to a worker than proceeding without disconnecting it; or
© the work consists only of diagnostic testing of the equipment, installation or
conductor.
(2) Subsection (10) applies, in addition to subsections (3) to (9), if the equipment,
installation or conductor is nominally rated at,
(a) greater than 400 amperes and greater than 200 volts; or
(b) greater than 200 amperes and greater than 300 volts.
(3) Only a worker who meets the requirements of clause 182 (1) (a) or (b) shall perform
the work.
(Note: Clause 182 specifies that the worker must hold a certificate of qualification as an
electrician.)

They keep referring or using the word worker.
Are we considered workers? After all we are only removing the panel cover and inspecting.

"The OAHI takes the position that if the panel cover can not be removed, home inspectors can not perform an adequate inspection of the electrical system and should advise the client accordingly. The OAHI was not consulted prior to the enactment of this regulation and contends that the magnitude of the electrical problems discovered by home inspectors has saved lives and improved electrical safety, and our safety record over the past 20 years should merit continuation of our accessing distribution panels"

During the 1980’s when I worked in a small population area served by only 2-3 electrical inspectors, I called the managing inspector to talk about panel cover removal. He was open minded about it as I started by pointing out that we get into many homes that have never been inspected since the original entrance was installed …and other wiring has been added, sometimes by the homeowner or a handyman/contractor who thinks he’s an electrician. I told him these homes will never get inspected until a service upgrade occurs which could be years in the future.

I gave him the name of one of the electricians in the area (who’s father was a retired inspector) and encouraged him to call. This electrician had remarked to me a few times about how much upgrade work resulted from my inspections and recounted it to the current manager in thier call. The manager called me a few days later and said “Go ahead; just be careful!”. he felt better when I told him that I had taught electrical labs in college and had worked under a local electrical contractor (a good friend) for 2.5 years.

Stress the # of homes out there that have not been evaluated electrically for years and never will be for many more years; they’ll start to get the picture and maybe reconsider.

“Worker” - (definition) means any person who performs work or supplies services for monetary compensation. - Under Part 1 OH&S Act - Ontario

So unless you are doing inspections for free - an inspector would be a service - and collecting a monetary fee.

As Brian stated some may view it as a personal decision, but it is not an issue until an accident happens, or until a disgruntled home owner reports you. That has actually happened, in several instances in Ontario where the owner called in OHS&A on the home inspectors.

Brian,

Good points. I have to agree. I have found major concerns by removing the panel cover. Yes even panels that were supposedly inspected by ESA!

As to the defintion of: *

“Worker” - (definition) means any person who performs work or supplies services for monetary compensation. - Under Part 1 OH&S Act - Ontario

*I don’t believe we are performing any electrical work, nor are we supplying services in regards to fixing/altering/installing, rather its visual in nature.

If the above definition applied, it could be argued that removing the furnace panel is working on or providing a service and would be disallowed by TSSA.

Please Claude can you show us some of these several instances.

I would love to read and get more information on what and how it happened.
Thanks … Cookie

I could name names, but in fairness. But I respect their privacy. If they would like to publicly announce it - than its their choice. One is a an instructor for OAHI.

As I stated before the details I have been told directly from one of these instances included the home owner reporting to the Ministry of Labour that the home inspector removed the electrical service panel cover in his home in an unsafe manner. That is what started this whole mess.

I remember one OAHI instructor who taught electrical and had or asked the students to stick their finger in the energized light socket. This inspector was also the report reviewer for OAHI who would repeatedly review reports to his own SOP and not that SOP which is mandated by the by-laws.

This same person was formerly a school teacher.

Now I see he is on the “conditional” list of TIPR examiners for the National in Ontario. Scary!

This is why we should open panels.
This is a 60 amp service in an old farmhouse.

I love this photo.

electrical2.jpg

We probably all have examples of why we should open panels.
2006_071223king0007.JPG

As for the gentleman in your previous post, I remember him telling a class during the defect recognition course…" and god forbid that you have a spelling mistake on your report, as this will lessen your chances of having a successfull verification" < to be spoken with a lofty british accent:mrgreen: .

That is only one of the many issues he would call out. He would also raise issues if you did not walk a roof, even though the SOP do not require one to walk the roof.

Ditto if you did not provide the btu of the heating/ac.

Each time a report was failed due to his ignorance and stupidity the member being reviewed would have to file another report for review, and pay additional costs. The report reviewer would stand to make money. Each time the report was reviewed he would stand to make some money. $$$$.

His name is Carl Inglis, and I found him to be arrogant and ignorant as many others did. Complaints about his performance went unheeded by his overseers the Board of Examiners/Admissions Review. The same group who have denied me my rights without just cause.

Now this same moron is a “Conditional” TIPR examiner.

Huston we have a problem.

Another reason for a complete forensic audit of OAHI a major principal in the National Certification.

I know what was being covered up and ignored because I was the DPPC Chair at the time.

Thanks for verifying what we know to be major issues and concerns within OAHI.

Committees List & Information 2006-2007

					 **Admissions Review Committee / Board of Examiners**

Mandate: To assess member’s credentials, and to make recommendations to the membership on all matters of an educational nature including development of courses, seminars, programs, and related activities.
Andrew Bennett
Terry Carson
Andrew Dixon
Glenn Gogal
Carl D. Inglis
Andrew Radomski
Doug Silverthorn

and I found him to be arrogant and ignorant as many others did.

You forgot to mention pompous a$$.:mrgreen: