Falling Off A Roof

Friend sent me an article out of this months NAHI magazine on ladders and roof climbing. Seems last years national President of NAHI was on job with trainee. Had a tall 2 story roof his ladder would not reach … So instead of just saying that and referring them to a professional roofer, he climbs the 1st roof AND has trainee push ladder up to him. He then sets the ladder on the 2nd story roof AND starts climbing up to the next roof. Just as he gets to 2nd level, something slips AND down falls the inspector to 1st roof … Then rolls off it and drops onto the driveway below and WITH his ladder still up on roof. DUMB, even newbies don’t try a stupid move like that. If the ladder don’t reach to a 12’-15’ height, OR binoculars won’t see the roof … Do the sensible thing AND refer it to a professional roofer.

Fortunately with the seller, buyer and agent there, they were able to call 911 and get him to a hospital ER quickly.

**Sample Report Text: ** The rear low slope roof over the dormer was not visible due to height and slope (Front of house roof was too steep for a typical home inspector to safely climb without special equipment, etc. Rear of house roof was too tall for inspectors 17’ ladder to reach). Therefore nothing is known of the condition of the rear dormer roof or its accessories, etc. Concealed defects are NOT in the scope of our inspection. We noted holes in the vinyl siding at the gable that may be hail related. We recommend having a competent roofing contractor review the roofing system to determine the condition of the rear roof AND if hail damage exists up there AND if repair is needed. We recommend this being done before leaving your inspection contingency period AND we also recommend that you verify the insurability and acceptability of the roofing with your insurance company prior to closing escrow.
Morale of story … Be safe / NOT stupid.

Wow - great point Dan.
Had an inspector friend many years ago that went on the 1st level of a wood shake roof, then pulled the ladder up to get to the top level.

The ladder slipped out, down he came with a broken arm & punctured lung.
He had trouble even talking without taking many breaths in-between for the rest of his life.

Well… seems to me CB has posted a few pics of him doing exactly that! Along with all of his boasting, and now as a CMI, seems he is in violation of a Ethics charge or two for endangering other HI’s!

Thanks for your post, Dan, hopefully countering the foolish prodding that an HI MUST walk all roofs. You may have just saved a few lives today!

Like this?

Lol, I do that all the time Juan

Hey dude there is plenty of room on the ground for you and the women and children;-)

Hey Dan if you want me to bid that job in Ka shoot me the info I can bid it this week end probably Sunday I have roofs to climb tomorrow

This was the bad boy I was inspecting when you called Nice A/C install

I would only do that if my assistant is with me to hold the ladder. The upper ladder can easily kick out, especially since it’s pivot point looks to be at the gutter.

Who pays for the damage to the lower roof that the ladder causes? Shingles were sticking to my shoes the other day when it was 93 outside, I’m sure that upper ladder woulda made some nice indents in the shingles (if it didn’t poke holes)

Not a scratch…

Ever…

You don’t need to do it, but don’t make stuff up. You sound like James Bushart when you make stuff up.

I would only do that if my assistant is with me to hold the ladder. The upper ladder can easily kick out, especially since it’s pivot point looks to be at the gutter.

Who pays for the damage to the lower roof that the ladder causes? Shingles were sticking to my shoes the other day when it was 93 outside, I’m sure that upper ladder woulda made some nice indents in the shingles (if it didn’t poke holes)

Oh, I’ve done it a few times-I just do it smart, and take care not to harm someone’s property. It’s the right thing to do, IMO.

No need to make stuff up. Real life has enough drama for me!

As for JB-I don’t think he makes stuff up–he dreams stuff up :cool:

I’m not sure why you asked about damage to the roof then, because you should know it doesn’t cause damage to the roof.

Luckily the only roof I ever damaged that way was my own. Not much, just a few scratched granules.

The potential for damage is obvious, even for a novice.

Experience is knowing, prevention is the best cure :smiley:

You can damage the house if you let go of a ladder and it hits the house. You can damage a car.
You can break a vase carrying a ladder through the house.

The potential for damage is obvious so why point it out as some kind of warning?

It was just fear mongering like good old Bushart.

Just pointing out to always be safe, especially when putting ladders on someone’s roof. Didn’t mean to offend. There are newbies on this mb. I hope they read the OP.

Big difference in fair, cautious warning and fear mongering. You’re smart enough to know the difference, Juan.

You said I should know it doesn’t cause damage. Speaking from experience, I know for a fact that it will.

There’s a fine line between confidence and cockiness. You know the difference. Some may not.

Yeah and the first thing you said “Who pays for the damage to the lower roof that the ladder causes?”

That isn’t a warning.

It’s fear mongering.

And like I said, my intentions were not to offend, unlike calling someone a “fear mongerer”.

If I damage someone’s roof, I would feel the pain of paying for it. Not everyone has a retirement income or other source to help ease that pain.

Each his own. Just be careful. Hope that doesn’t come across as “fear mongering”.

Hoping our confidence doesn’t make us cocky.

Juan …

You know better than that. Over 35 years inspecting in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, Arkansas, Illinois, etc … There have been more than multiple times when I’ve been on a comp shingle roof or roll roof on a typical summer 92-100 degree day AND just turned sideways and had REAL hot roofing material twist under my feet and damage the roofing (we see it frequently and usually describe it as mechanical foot damage). Same can easily happen with a ladder.

I’ve also had times when up on an older, worn brittle wood shingle roof, AND walking across the shingles broke or split MORE shingles OR setting the ladder can easily happen also.

JUST because it has not happened to you … lets not pretend it doesn’t happen OR couldn’t readily happen. The guy that said that was NOT a fear monger, JUST stating a fact that MAY or MAY NOT happen to you.

Some like to play the odds. Ask Red Hat Charley.

I never gamble.

That’s why the** first** thing I actually said was I wouldn’t do it without my assistant on the job.

Juan mistakenly thought the first thing I said was “who’s gonna pay for the damaged roof”. (a fear monger question)

Some “Super-home-inspectors” are untouchable, and the stars align just right for them every time. I like the stars, but not the odds, so I’ll keep using my assistant when needed. :cool:

In 18 years I can say I have never damaged a roof shingle must be pretty good and I am not sure about the odd part. :wink: