Inspecting Appliances

Good day,

I am a new inspector and loving every inspection I can get! My question has to do with inspecting appliances. Correct me if I am wrong, but believe the SOP states that we do not inspect appliances. However, on virtually every inspection I am asked by the realtor or HO to check some or all appliances for operation such as: the range, oven, dishwasher, clothes washer, clothes dryer, etc…

I have heard many inspectors regularly inspect these appliances as part of the inspection. I have also read that we are responsible only for built-in appliances. Built-in to me would mean range, oven, disposal, dishwasher, and a microwave if it was not removable. But not the fridge, clothes washer, or clothes dryer.

Could you clarify for me what is our responsibility regarding household appliances? I think I understand the SOP but what I am hearing other inspectors are doing has confused me.

Thanks
Gregg

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You have a State SOP that must be followed. It supercedes all organization SOP’s.

The Washington State SOP is the guideline that I follow. The InterNACHI and ASHI SOP both state the same as the WA State SOP. No appliances. Is there any liability or precedence being set by inspecting appliances? From what I have read so far it sounds like it is a choice each individual inspector make.

You are not required to inspect appliances. That being said, think how your client will feel if the day they move in the stove doesn’t function, the dishwasher leaks or the microwave / fan just hums. Those are out of pocket expenses they will need to pay in order to have a functioning piece of equipment. And who will they remember? The home inspector that didn’t tell them.

I am not saying you have to check if a range/ oven / cooktop is at the proper temperature, but to just make sure the bake, broil and top coils heat. Does the microwave even work? Does the dishwasher at least function?

Sounds like you want to get in and get out. To perform these checks takes little time and is a service to your client. But each to their own.

You either check them or you do not.
Be consistent.
That being said it is bad business practice not to.

You are responsible to check hookups as the stove has gas shutoffs and piping correct ?

If Washer and dryer are staying I would run them and also be sure to check
dryer vent hookup and material as this can be a safety issue as well.

Having been a head appliance installer years ago
I know how much damage and expense can be involved from safety and financial standpoints.

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Mr. Thornberry(a non inspector) acts is if he doesn’t manage client expectations.

He is constantly doing just that to sell his “products”

Managing a clients expectations is appropriate when you tell the truth.

Mike I have no pony in this race however it should be noted you are chasing Mr Thornberry from a non public thread to insult him.
His advice is solid and some may consider your comment as inappropriate.
When it happened to me a considered them as stalkers.
Please do not lower your standing in the forum community this way.

do you manage client expectations?

nathan thinks this is wrong when he said

“Gregg, you’ll hear a lot of inspectors out there use the phrase “manage client expectations”, which is a fancy way of saying if they didn’t explain thoroughly all the stuff they don’t do, their clients would be disappointed regularly.”

Gregg I ask what is staying with the home and i check it for operation . Like Nathan said if it is built in check it. Pretty simple.

Yep, do it all the time.

I agree with what he said.
Many inspectors for instance have page after page of disclaimers that go on and on.
Clients want results rather than excuses and it seems that was Nathans point.

Bob, then you disagree with the lawyers many inspectors and Nick himself.

Good luck.

And if you don’t think nathan sets expectations for his potential clients, you have not been paying attention.

I prefer to spend more time inspecting than disclaiming and I am not sure how you have become Nicks official spokesperson.

Based on your statement about Nathan setting expectations for his clients not sure I can beleive either.

Are you aware of any unhappy Recall Chek clients ?
Please post even one here or shut up.

Yeah thought so but bet you still do not shut up anyway.
You are not a client or a past client of his and have no reason to spend your day obsessing his products .

Fine you do not like him personally …have you met him ?

Just seems odd to follow his posts and make negative comments all day is all I am saying.

Most would call that a vendetta.
I am done here.

I’m not talking about disclaiming alone.

RC members are not allowed to speak negatively, right?

False.

Ask one…oh right here I am.

I do not care for the 90 day warranty and do not sell alarm systems.
Feel it is like spaming clients and have no interest.

Uh Oh somebody is at the door.:frowning:

Many of us feel the same.

But that is my personal opinion.
There are many services and products I ,you,and many others do not use or care for.

Recall Chek is a fine product which is perhaps a little pricey but free if you use the other service products.

This is personal opinion which you have never asked for and I find strange seeing as how I actually am signed up and have used the products but while all the 5-6 guys are busy ranting and raving they never once asked the opinion of the most say it like it is guy here …“ME”.

I even offered to give my opinion in the other thread with not one taker as the pack of wolves was to busy salivating at the red meat of Nathan.

Recall Chek is 100% better than the freebie version Linas posted but then again it is free.
Does Nathan over spin at times …Yes.

That does not take value away from his software program.

If marketing the product has value and clients find value it will succeed but if it has little value it will not and as a capitolist Mike I am shocked at how you fail to see this as obvious.
Not to me but admit to yourself that if the product has little value it will fail with or without the pack tearing at Nathans skin.

You guys are actually creating more and more product recognition …AMAZING!

To the OP:
It is a business decision that you need to make. How long does it take to check the appliances? If you develop a system which incorporates the appliances, it takes hardly anymore time than it does to not inspect the appliances.

I have always inspected appliances and always will. In fact, here in Florida, if the new Standards of Practice are ever adopted, it will be a requirement.

If you are concerned about liability, you can contact an attorney and have him draw you up something to protect you.

Here is what I have on my appliance page:
“There is no warranty expressed or implied for any appliance tested.
Note: Cleaning cycle was not tested for oven.
This Inspection is not to be used to determine if any recalls exist for any appliances.
Magnum Inspections Inc. will not be responsible for any recalled appliances. It is up to the Buyer to investigate and determine if any recalls are in effect for any of the appliances located on the property.
The average life expectancy of any appliance is between 12-15 years. Any appliances that are older than 12-15 years may require replacement in the near future.”

If you wish, feel free to use the above and substitute your companies name.