Insurance requirements for licensing

Just curious how much variation there is from state to state regarding insurance requirements for home inspectors. Here in Florida they require proof of insurance to be part of the submission package. Are your states similar?

Home Inspectors Insurance Minimums in FL

Home Inspector General Liability Insurance Requirements in Florida

  • In order to apply for a home inspection license, you are required to submit proof of general liability insurance coverage of no less than $300,000.

Home Inspector Errors & Omissions Insurance Requirements in Florida

  • The state of Florida does not mandate a requirement for home inspector Errors & Omissions Insurance except for Mold Inspectors/Assessors, which are required to maintain $1,000,000 aggregate

Brett, the in no licensing and no insurance requirements in Michigan… :smile:

Is there any education requirement?

Not from Michigan… :smile:

Dang, that’s hard to imagine. So Johnny the cashier can just open shop and start doing home inspections?

Better yet…Barbie the baby sitter can open up shop tomorrow!

Just come here with pictures and get all the answers for her report. :grin:

I might have to plan on some summers by the great lakes.

Lots of business in and around the Detroit area. :smile:

Maryland was the same. I gave them a hard time when I called asking how long for them to process it because it was money in the garbage until my license was issued paying for insurance I couldn’t use. It took them a couple weeks so not horrible but I feel your pain.

No worries yet. I’m still a long way from applying for a license. My mind keeps turning and thinking about all the potential obstacles. I tend to overthink.

Any opinions on carrying the optional E&O insurance? Seems that inspecting a home creates lots of opportunities for an error or omission even for the best inspectors. On the other hand I could see that insurance policy making one a target by a money hungry lawyer.

I’m sure I am alone in this thought, but E&O is for both me and my client. If I make a mistake, it shouldn’t cost my client money. After all, they got a home inspection to know what they were buying. If the mistake is more costly than I have money, they are screwed. My E&O protects us both. I don’t think anyone is more likely to sue me for having insurance because no one has even asked if I carry it :slightly_smiling_face:

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That’s a good way to look at it.

Texas is mandatory $100k E&O.
No general liability required.
Pretty heavy education/experience requirements.